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Author Topic: Farm Raising Blue Crabs  (Read 35098 times)
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BlakeH
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« on: July 02, 2005, 10:32:55 AM »

Can anyone tell me if farm raising blue crabs is something that is done, or can be done?   
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T3RockHall
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« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2005, 08:51:10 AM »

Not really exactly your answer, but...
When we house hunting, we saw a place (somewhere around the Cambridge area) that had a huge open roofed structure filled with stainless steel partitioned tables (sorta like basins) in a U-shape that went around the building's perimeter. Water from the adjacent marsh was pumped through this array, and it was explained to us that it was for raising soft-shell crabs. Hard-shell crabs went in one end, and as their life cycle progressed, the crabs were moved from one basin to the next. At the end, they went to market at a much higher rate than the hard shells would have brought. I suppose you had to be really aware of the various stages, because there were LOTS of these basins which looked like constant sorting was needed.

We didn't buy the property. The horseflies were as big as birds and the grass on the lawn crunched underfoot from the constant flooding, but it sure was an interesting place!
« Last Edit: July 03, 2005, 08:56:10 AM by T3RockHall » Logged
Crab A Lot
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« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2005, 09:39:31 AM »

Not really exactly your answer, but...
When we house hunting, we saw a place (somewhere around the Cambridge area) that had a huge open roofed structure filled with stainless steel partitioned tables (sorta like basins) in a U-shape that went around the building's perimeter. Water from the adjacent marsh was pumped through this array, and it was explained to us that it was for raising soft-shell crabs. Hard-shell crabs went in one end, and as their life cycle progressed, the crabs were moved from one basin to the next. At the end, they went to market at a much higher rate than the hard shells would have brought. I suppose you had to be really aware of the various stages, because there were LOTS of these basins which looked like constant sorting was needed

T-3 Rockhall,

What was the address of this soft-crab operation,sound like if your down that way it would be intereseting to see,also did they sell soft-crabs. laugh laugh

Boy love them soft-crab sandwich's with lettice tomatoes and mayo Grin Grin Grin Cool Cool Cool

We didn't buy the property. The horseflies were as big as birds and the grass on the lawn crunched underfoot from the constant flooding, but it sure was an interesting place!
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Chesapeake Bay Crabs are the best!!!!!!!!
T3RockHall
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« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2005, 01:36:44 PM »

What was the address of this soft-crab operation,sound like if your down that way it would be intereseting to see,also did they sell soft-crabs.

Man, that was 3 Summers ago! All I remember is that we were taken there by a Buyer's Broker named Tom Bond (out of Chestertown) and he was with Chesapeake Buyers Brokerage!. I don't know if he's still affiliated with them. If you find him, you can tell him that Harris Ruben sent you.

That's all I can tell you except... the woman who was selling the place said it was her late father's business, and she was selling off the estate. There were no crabs in the shed, and it wasn't a going business at that time.
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mariner
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« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2005, 04:28:05 PM »

University of Maryland has been raising blues for some time. Doing research on increasing the population.
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Rachel
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« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2005, 11:07:38 PM »

The practice is to "hatch & dump" juveniles.  Blue crabs are cannibals  Shocked making it difficult to raise to maturity. 
Here is a site to check out
http://www.serc.si.edu/labs/fish_invert_ecology/featured_presentation.jsp
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canoetrot
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« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2005, 04:57:48 PM »

Yep - many have thought about raising blue crabs, but as mentioned by ESG they are extremely cannibalistic and the only way to get them to market size in a tank is to keep them separated.  I'm sure someone soon will look at renting estuary land like the clam growers do to see if that can work, but then you get into the problem of what to do with them during the winter. 

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injectchen
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« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2005, 10:51:27 AM »

Yep - many have thought about raising blue crabs, but as mentioned by ESG they are extremely cannibalistic and the only way to get them to market size in a tank is to keep them separated.  I'm sure someone soon will look at renting estuary land like the clam growers do to see if that can work, but then you get into the problem of what to do with them during the winter. 



During the winter? How about raising blue crabs in Mexico? There would be no this kind of problem.

Do anybody here is serious about thinking this blue crab raising business? I came from Asia, where aquaculture is an important industry; however, it seems that Americans on studying aquaculture are more focusing on natural re-stocking perspect than on farming. Is that true?

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Rachel
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« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2005, 03:36:16 PM »

I am serious about it but, I don't have the PhD that is needed to get grants.  I'm hoping to go back to school soon to study Crustacean ecology.
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procrabber
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« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2005, 05:07:14 PM »

eastern shore gal, have you visited the hatchery program in baltimore.  I am in kahhots with a few of the researchers there if you want a tour.  i used to be there, now i am in UM, baltimore.  Black irish and others took a tour a few months back.  best bet if you want to get into the MEES program in UMD is to get a job with SERC or at COMB.  other choice is to go to VIMS, but i like COMB better..... beautiful location
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Steve
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« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2005, 07:54:29 AM »

eastern shore gal, have you visited the hatchery program in baltimore. I am in kahhots with a few of the researchers there if you want a tour. i used to be there, now i am in UM, baltimore. Black irish and others took a tour a few months back. best bet if you want to get into the MEES program in UMD is to get a job with SERC or at COMB. other choice is to go to VIMS, but i like COMB better..... beautiful location

I would like to get my hands on their research paper (report) that was published not too long ago. They promised me a copy but no one will return my emails now.
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Rachel
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« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2005, 01:16:28 PM »

here are a couple of titles that have been published in 2005.

Let me know if you want one and I will try to get you a copy.

Assessing the potential for stock enhancement in the case of the Chesapeake Bay blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

Large-scale juvenile production of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus
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procrabber
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« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2005, 10:50:47 PM »

I would like to get my hands on their research paper (report) that was published not too long ago. They promised me a copy but no one will return my emails now.

steve, they have about 10 papers a week come out of COMB.  if you let me know who wrote it and what it was about, i can probably get you a copy.  maybe even permission to post, or at least a link
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megalopa
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« Reply #13 on: October 27, 2005, 01:53:06 PM »

Here's the paper:

Large-scale juvenile production of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus
Odi Zmora*, Andrea Findiesen, John Stubblefield, Victor Frenkel, Yonathan Zohar
Aquaculture Vol. 244 (2005): pgs. 129 139

you can find the journal Aquaculture at any big library (college park has it), and photocopy the article. not sure if the folks at COMB will give you permission to post the article itself.

they raise the animals to about 1 inch across, and then do release-and-recapture experiments with the folks at the Smithsonian in Edgewater. Grow-out for raising adult crabs, as far as I know, hasn't been done for blue crabs (except every once in a while they'll have a juvenile that gets "left behind" at COMB and they raise it to an adult). It gets trickier to do that because of cannibalism, shell disease, and they're not really sure what to feed them yet.
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sotexblucrab
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« Reply #14 on: October 25, 2007, 07:09:40 PM »

I also am interested in the farming of Blue Crab i currently have been harvesting large males in the fresh saltwater cannals on the shrimp farm.There are ponds availble if this is a practicle way to harvest mature crab.
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marysue1227
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« Reply #15 on: October 25, 2007, 08:59:56 PM »

Check out this article

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/nationworld/bal-te.hatchery30apr30,0,7051772.story?coll=bal-home-headlines


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I'd rather be crabbing!!  Wink

Calm seas do not make a skilled sailor!

Don't start none! Won't be none!

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