August 16, 2018, 11:25:29 AM
 
*
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
 
 
 
Total time logged in: 0 minutes.
 
   Home   Help Login Register  

     
 

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: CLOSED CRAB POT AREAS IN CORE SOUND PUBLIC MEETING  (Read 4231 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Steve
Administrator
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3219
Location: Northern Neck



WWW
« on: June 07, 2004, 07:34:15 AM »

CLOSED CRAB POT AREAS IN CORE SOUND
PUBLIC MEETING


The North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries will hold a public meeting at 6:00 P.M. on Wednesday, June 9, 2004 at the Sea Level Fire and Rescue Squad Building, Sea Level, NC.  The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss a request by long haul seine operators to set aside four areas, three in Core Sound and one in southeastern Pamlico Sound, for the exclusive use of long haul seines during portions of the year.  Crab pots would be excluded from these areas during those times.

Marine Fisheries Commission (MFC) Rule 15A NCAC 3J .0301 (j) allows the Director to issue a proclamation, with prior consent of the MFC, that prohibits crab pot use in an area in order to resolve conflict.  The proliferation of pots has prevented long haul seine operators from being able to haul some of the traditional haul areas and two individuals have requested that areas be set aside for their use.  These proposed areas include Barry Bay, Nelson Bay, Cedar Island Bay in Core Sound, and Evergreen Slough in southeastern Pamlico Sound.  Crab pots would be prohibited in Barry Bay from April 1 through June 1 each year.  Pots would be prohibited in Nelson Bay from April 15 through June 1.  No pots would be allowed in Cedar Island Bay from April 1 through April 30, and in Evergreen Slough from May 1 through October 20.  Maps of these areas will be available at the meeting.  

In the past, crab potters agreed to move their pots on days the long haul crews wanted to work.  Over the years, increased numbers of crab pots from local potters and more and more that do not live in the surrounding area have made this cooperation very difficult and the haul seiners have been forced to abandon some traditional haul areas.  This process is an attempt to bring the parties together and discuss a solution.

Following the meeting, the Director has the option to deny the request or submit a proposed proclamation granting the request to the MFC for their approval.  The next scheduled meeting of the MFC is July 20 and 21, 2004 in Jacksonville, NC.

For further information call Fisheries Management Chief David Taylor at 252-726-7021 or 1-800-682-2632.  
Logged
Pete Miller
Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 82
Location: Marshallberg, NC


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2004, 11:12:58 AM »

I sure hope the meeting is well attended by the crabbers working the area that do not live in the area.  I am afraid if a agreement is not made there will be vandalism and violence again.

Alot of history of violence between haulers and crabbers in the Carolinas going back to the 60's.

Logged

Pete Miller
252-269-0241
Steve
Administrator
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3219
Location: Northern Neck



WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2004, 08:16:19 AM »

Potters and netters work out agreement for down east waters

By Brad Rich
NEWS-TIMES
June 11, 2004

SEA LEVEL – Representatives of two of the three remaining commercial longhaul seine crews working in down east waters may have reached an agreement Wednesday with crab potters whose gear needs to be in the same waters at virtually the same time.

John “Buster” Salter and Danny Mason, who run crews in the state’s second oldest fishery – the oyster fishery is the oldest – had petitioned the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries to totally ban crab pots in portions of Evergreen Slough, Thorofare-Barry Bay , Nelson Bay and Cedar Island Bay during periods that ranged from April 1 through June 1.

The petition, filed under a little-used state rule designed to ease user group conflicts, stirred little opposition at first because it was little known.

But when crab potters – especially those who set “peeler” pots and must make their catches and their money in short periods of time during the spring – found out about the proposal through a story in this newspaper Sunday, they decided to show up and protest during the meeting, which division director Pres Pate convened outside, behind the Sea Level Fire and Rescue Squad Building.

“We get peelers only in April,” said potter Luther Mason. “If you take that month away from us, we don’t have anything.

“We’ve always worked with you and we want to continue to work with you,” Mr. Mason said to Mr. Salter. “But this (petition) says you want the water all for yourselves. It says ‘exclusive.’ ”

“We need to be in there at the same time you are,” said Mr. Salter, who, along with Mr. Mason and Bradley Styron run three crews that each use two boats to pull seines to catch primarily trout and croaker in the spring. “And this is the second oldest fishery in the state. We were working there before you ever set peeler pots.”

But potter Jimmy Goodwin, like Luther Mason, contended it wasn’t fair, and also that the potters had always moved their pots when asked by the local crews.

Instead of an outright ban, he suggested that the crews – only three remain out of 11 that once used the longhaul gear – work with the fisheries division to give the 72-hour notice to move their pots out of the haul channels.

“They could notify us and we could go out and move the pots, then they could make their haul and we could put our pots back,” he said.

Mr. Salter and Danny Mason at first doubted the system would work, because it might be difficult to track down the owners of the pots.

Mr. Pate, likewise, had concerns, specifically since proclamations filed by the director must go out to the fishing public 48 hours in advance. In essence, he said, that could result in a virtually endless flood of paperwork that would be confusing to the public and burdensome for the state agency.

Mr. Goodwin, however, said he believed the system could work, given the fact that most of the local potters historically have cooperated with the longhaul crews.

And, he and Luther Mason hinted, if the haulers weren’t willing to go along with giving notice, the potters might file their own petition for exclusive rights to the waters at the times they need them.

“You want it all,” Mr. Goodwin said at one point during the highly unusual and informal meeting. “Well, we need it then, too.”

After more than an hour of discussion and some additional suggestions, it appeared the fishermen had reached an impasse.

But one potter noted that most of the “problems’ stemmed not from pots set by the local fishermen, but from pots set by “woodsers,” fishermen who live not on the coast but “up in the woods … across the ( Neuse ) river” in and around New Bern in Craven County .

The division, potters eventually suggested, could simply compile a list of the owners of all the pots – information that should be easily available – and could notify them when the haulers needed access.

Failure to move pots by the deadline could result in tickets, they suggested.

Even more discussion followed, some of it acrimonious.

At one point, Mr. Salter declared that the suggestion simply would not work.

But potters urged the haulers – and each other – to work in cooperation, as the local have, to a large degree, in the past.

Potters also realized, as the meeting proceeded, that even a total pot ban in three of the four areas – excluding Cedar Island Bay – might not be a problem during the time periods that haulers had petitioned for exclusive access.

Mr. Goodwin even said that with proper notice and good cooperation, the potters could move their pots early in the morning on the day of a proposed longhaul trip, then could put them back in late in the afternoon.

Eventually, all parties agreed that it might be feasible to give the haulers what they wanted in Evergreen Slough, Barry Bay and Nelson Bay , but to require the 72-hour notice in Cedar Island Bay .

Mr. Pate said he was still concerned about the paperwork, but agreed to try to draw up a proclamation for consideration by the N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission, policy-making arm of the division.

  If he does so, the panel could consider the proposed compromise during its July 20-21 meeting in Jacksonville .

Logged
jack1747
Lifetime Member
Global Moderator
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18425
Location: Virginias Eastern Shore - Pocomoke Sound


Crab'n is a way of life....


WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2004, 09:39:58 AM »

long haul seines imho should be banned everywhere.  They sweep up every critter in thier path. Angry
Logged

"Helping to Moderate the BCA since 2003"
procrabber
Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 926
Location: Maryland


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2004, 09:59:09 AM »

the haulers will be lucky to get 6 cents a pound for croaker in april. it is a waste of fish anyway. the peeler poters put a hurting on the crab population, but at least the fishery doesnt go to waste
Logged

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
 
Home
 
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder


Google visited last this page July 12, 2018, 07:26:22 PM
wordpress