December 16, 2019, 09:05:44 AM
 
*
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
 
 
 
Total time logged in: 0 minutes.
 
   Home   Help Login Register  

     
 

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 6   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The Lunar Delusion - a final analysis  (Read 15466 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Pinchy
Registered User

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 979
Location: Center City, Philadelphia


Instructions: Hunt, fish, crab - rinse and repeat.




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2008, 11:00:14 AM »

pinchy is a legend in his own mind just ask him, it doesn't matter if people have been doing this for a living for 30-40 years he knows what his mr. wizard books tell him to believe laugh

Thanks, anchor. Cheesy You've done more to expose the weakness of your position in one ungrammatical sentence than I did in my seven paragraphs, by your argumentum ad hominem (if you've forgotten your Latin studies, this means that you attack me instead of the topic at hand). I've never heard of or seen any volumes authored by a "Mr. Wizard"; perhaps you could enlighten us by citing a couple titles and publication dates? If you have the mettle to defend yourself, and wish to bolster your argumentum ad ignorantiam, why don't you try to logically refute any of the seven points I presented? (BTW, "your mother told you so" doesn't count.)
« Last Edit: February 06, 2008, 11:11:11 AM by Pinchy » Logged

Please pack your trash out, pick up others', and leave your fishing spot cleaner than when you found it.
Pinchy
Registered User

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 979
Location: Center City, Philadelphia


Instructions: Hunt, fish, crab - rinse and repeat.




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2008, 11:05:23 AM »

Yes they do but at a slow rate, I shed one or two a day...


I didn't realize that the full moon appears every day in Florida. laugh Seriously, you've got crabs shedding daily; it should be understood that you are feeding these crabs, while those in the wild are probably in a state of hibernation. No food, low temperatures, no growth: quod erat demonstrandum, the moon has nothing to do with molting, it is purely a function of growth rate in direct relation to food supply and temperature (among other non-lunar factors). Thanks for the report, RD. Case closed.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2008, 11:35:41 AM by Pinchy » Logged

Please pack your trash out, pick up others', and leave your fishing spot cleaner than when you found it.
R D
Lifetime Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6370
Location: St. Marks Fl. If ever a time should come, when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in Government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin.(Samuel Adams)





Ignore
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2008, 12:34:58 PM »



I didn't realize that the full moon appears every day in Florida. laugh Seriously, you've got crabs shedding daily; it should be understood that you are feeding these crabs, while those in the wild are probably in a state of hibernation. No food, low temperatures, no growth: quod erat demonstrandum, the moon has nothing to do with molting, it is purely a function of growth rate in direct relation to food supply and temperature (among other non-lunar factors). Thanks for the report, RD. Case closed.
Remember we are in Fla,things are different down here.I don't feed them other than what cannibalism that goes on.We have a few crabs shed in the wild all winter except during the hard freezes,I had one softshell in my pots yesterday and a few papershells.
Here our best peeler runs occur on the big tides,when we have a higher and lower than normal tide which seems to conincide with the new and full moons most of the time unless we are having a storm event.
Logged

Organized Fishermen of Fla.                                                                                                                              
''Life's tough ... it's even tougher if you're stupid.''
- John Wayne
mdjohn
Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4493
Location: back of the class





Ignore
« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2008, 01:21:36 PM »

we used to go out on the full moon because the tide was higher and they would move into the shallows and hide among the grasses to shed. we would use a dip net to get them.

a guy even used traps sort of - 12 inch pipe cut down the middle 12 inches long like a kwansit hut. he would put these on his shore line. in the morning he would put his net on one end of the pipe and put a stick in the other end. the buster would swim into his net or he raised the pipe and picked up the peeler.

 Grin Grin Grin Grin laugh laugh laugh
Logged
jack1747
Lifetime Member
Global Moderator
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 19006
Location: Virginias Eastern Shore - Pocomoke Sound


Crab'n is a way of life....


WWW
« Reply #24 on: February 06, 2008, 01:51:23 PM »

   The Lunar Delusion - a final analysis
« on: Yesterday at 01:36:01 PM »   Quote


I do not mean to single out Jack - he is a fine person, writer, and waterman. But this post is a continuing example of confusion on this topic and it needs to be cleared up and disposed of.

Quote from: jack1747 on February 04, 2008, 05:23:50 PM
The fish didn't get her when she [shed] on the last full moon...

Fact: She did shed on the last full moon.

Kindly indulge my continuing effort to disabuse you of this fantastical connection between a moon and a shed. Let's examine this step-by-logical step:

1. Crabs do not shed in winter. To those of you who will claim something like, "oh they can't see the moon..." there is a simple reply:

Fact: Crabs shed all year long in warm climates.

a) How do you know they cannot see winter moonlight? Crabs burrow into the mud in the winter months but their antennae, eyes and mouthparts remain slightly above the surface bottom to maintain gill circulation. In the clear, cold, winter water some light would penetrate. Do you seriously imagine that a wintering crab "sees" a full moon, jumps up, and sheds her shell?

Fact: No one said crabs “see’s” a full moon.  We said crabs shed more on a full moon (cycle).  They do not see the moon in my basement.

b) As noted below, molting begins two full weeks before the shell is shed. Do you seriously imagine that a wintering crab is sitting on the bay floor, observing the lunar cycle, and anticipating the full moon?
Of course not, crabs do not shed in winter because they are in a hibernation state and their growth rate is slowed or stopped. Therefore the moon can have no effect.

Fact: Crabs do shed all year in warmer climates and in aquariums.

2. From a reproductive standpoint, it would be impossible for all or even most crabs to be shedding simultaneously. Since the female must be in a post-molt soft state to mate, the male by definition must be...er...in a hard state. Jokes aside, the male must possess a hard shell as he mates and protects the soft sook while fertilization takes place. If at every full moon every crab were molting, mating would never take place and the species would soon go extinct. Therefore the moon can have no effect.

Fact: No one said all the crabs shed on new or full moon cycles.  What is said is “More crabs shed on these cycles.”

3. Crabs do not suddenly molt; there are several physiological steps that take place before the final molt. For example, the preparatory "white sign" appears two weeks prior to molt. There are at least three possibilities for this development:
a) there is a biological imperative (i.e. the crab is growing) and a hormonal/mechanical process intitiates.
b) the crab "knows" that a full moon will appear in two weeks, and the crab begins her undressing process 14 days before the ball.
c) assuming the moon has anything to do with molting, since we have learned that molting begins 14 days prior, perhaps it is the waxing moon to blame for the molt, and not the full moon.
Which of these three, a), b), or c), do you seriously believe is actually the cause of molting?

Since we are assuming things now, let us assume that the whole Pocomoke sound reaches 50 degree’s within a day or two.  Could we assume then that all the crabs there would be triggered to begin actives at about the same time?  Bringing them into pre-molt about the same time, based on equal amounts of food? 

Fact: The first peeler run on the Pocomoke Sound is the first new moon or full moon cycle after the water reaches 60 degrees or so.   


4. It is an indisputable fact that even during the full moon, you can catch crabs in all states of shell hardness. Therefore, the moon cannot be the sole influence (if at all) on crab molting.

Fact: You do catch “crabs in all states of shell hardness”.  Just you catch more peelers During the full and new moon cycles.  Less hard crabs cause the males are looking for the Sally’s.
 
5. It is an indisputable fact that crabs shed at different rates depending on age and size. [Jack and others with fish tanks can easily test this: place one, two, three, four, five and six-inch crabs together and observe rates of molting. Of course, there is the risk of cannibalistic crustaceicide with this arrangement, so try the experiment in separate tanks if possible.] Of course, this homemade observation is unnecessary as the literature is clear on this point: the molting rate is an energy-dependent process which is only begun as a physiological imperative, i.e. the crab would not survive unless he grows into a new shell. This happens weekly when young, and bi or tri-monthly when older. Therefore, the moon can have no effect.

Fact: I have been keeping crabs in aquariums since, well more than a half century.  First one I remember was in a gallon pickle jar.  Since then “MY” aquarium kept crabs have shed more often on a full moon than not.  Year around.  Many times in rooms without windows.

6. Even assuming the lunar theory, what can the cause possibly be? What evolutionary process could have caused the blue crab to gain an advantage by shedding on the full moon? If you believe the reflected light is the answer, why would a crab wish to expose his soft shell to predators, including other crabs, when the night light is brightest? Crabs try to hide when molting, maximum exposure would be fatal rather than protective. Well, maybe you imagine there is some gravitational cause...but you forget that the moon is always there regardless of how much light is reflected and whether you can see it or not. The gravitational attraction between a 4 oz. crab and the lunar body approx. 239,000 miles away is effectively a constant zero. Therefore, there can be no lunar gravitational effect on crab molting.

Fact: During these lunar cycles we experience “spring tides”.  The is more habitat available to support more sloughs.  More places to hide.  Walk the salt marshes after a spring tide and you will (used to) find crabs way back up in the marsh grasses.

7. You have neglected to consider the most likely answer to this delusion: the anthropocentric fallacy which causes all of us to mistake our biased observations for causality. We see the small proportion of crabs in our traps, pots, pilings which are shedding; we do not see the millions of others which are not shedding. Like primitive peoples who thought that their dances brought rain and didn't realize that their propitious storm formed many days prior and many miles away, we forget that crabs begin molting two weeks before the full moon peeks out (there is an example of anthropomorphism - the moon doesn't "peek" even if we like to imagine it does). We see more or fewer crabs in the traps, and imagine all sorts of reasons why this is so: rain or no rain, luck or lack of it, wind or no wind, a moon with more or less sunlight bouncing off it. All of these old wives' tales can be fun to bandy about, but there comes a time when grown men have to accept reproducible scientific tests, facts

“anthropocentric fallacy “ What ever that means.

“We see the small proportion of crabs in our traps, pots, pilings which are shedding;”  Does that mean “You” see more shedders in your traps?

Question:  How many peeler pots do you fish?  How many have you pulled in your life time?  How often do you fish peeler pots? Do you hard crab pot?

Fact: It is a lot different what one see in a trap, hand line, or trot line vs. what is observed in pots.  They go in and usually don’t go out.
Logged

"Helping to Moderate the BCA since 2003" "I've gotten to the point in my life where I no longer give a [shiz] what people think, I'm not going to take any [shiz], because, frankly my dears, I am NOT in the [shiz] business." Quote from Suzy. :-)

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Pinchy
Registered User

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 979
Location: Center City, Philadelphia


Instructions: Hunt, fish, crab - rinse and repeat.




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: February 06, 2008, 02:07:35 PM »

we used to go out on the full moon because the tide was higher and they would move into the shallows and hide among the grasses to shed. we would use a dip net to get them.
a guy even used traps sort of - 12 inch pipe cut down the middle 12 inches long like a kwansit hut. he would put these on his shore line. in the morning he would put his net on one end of the pipe and put a stick in the other end. the buster would swim into his net or he raised the pipe and picked up the peeler.

Fine, you had easier access to shedders in the shallow grass, no one will deny that anecdote. It does not follow that an equal number of peelers weren't on the bottom of the bay or inaccessible grasses during low tide and the waning/waxing moon periods.

This idea of making a baitless "Quonset hut" to attract doublers and peelers is brilliant, thanks! This afternoon I'll walk over to a local construction site, pick up some scrap PVC pipe, and make several "traps" for myself. This spring will leave them on the edge of my favorite waterway in the evening, return in the morning, and see what's in 'em.



Logged

Please pack your trash out, pick up others', and leave your fishing spot cleaner than when you found it.
long green crabber
In Memoriam 12/2011
Lifetime Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2252
Location: balto. county


crabbin` cruiser




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: February 06, 2008, 04:06:32 PM »

 zzz
Logged
tattoo
Lifetime Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 78476
Location: Glassboro NJ.


MY BOAT CRAB TRAP


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #27 on: February 06, 2008, 04:13:18 PM »

 laugh laugh laugh argue zzz sleeping smash smash toilet wall laugh laugh laugh laugh
Logged

A CRAB A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY.   

Click Here To Mount Your Crab
HenPot
Lifetime Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3256
Location: Red Lion, PA




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: February 06, 2008, 06:07:00 PM »

If you two decide to duel at sunrise, I am rooting for a tie!
Logged
tattoo
Lifetime Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 78476
Location: Glassboro NJ.


MY BOAT CRAB TRAP


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #29 on: February 06, 2008, 07:24:39 PM »

 laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh
Logged

A CRAB A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY.   

Click Here To Mount Your Crab

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

BOTTOM FEEDER
Lifetime Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1696
Location: KINGSVILLE MD


GUNPOWDER PIRATE




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: February 06, 2008, 07:25:49 PM »

Full moon ............Harvest moon...............Half  moon......... ITS ALL GOOD  Roll Eyes Roll Eyes laugh laugh         
Logged

Many good seamen go down the drain....I happen to be a lucky one
tattoo
Lifetime Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 78476
Location: Glassboro NJ.


MY BOAT CRAB TRAP


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #31 on: February 06, 2008, 07:26:35 PM »

 Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh
Logged

A CRAB A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY.   

Click Here To Mount Your Crab
tattoo
Lifetime Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 78476
Location: Glassboro NJ.


MY BOAT CRAB TRAP


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #32 on: February 06, 2008, 07:45:34 PM »

They are the uglyest moons i have seen yet. would make me want to shed.  laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh laugh
Logged

A CRAB A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY.   

Click Here To Mount Your Crab
madcrabber1113
Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2435
Location: earleville maryland


http://www.bluecrab.info/forum/index.php?action=dl




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: February 06, 2008, 07:57:38 PM »

I'm blind!Thanks allot.  Cry
Logged
BOTTOM FEEDER
Lifetime Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1696
Location: KINGSVILLE MD


GUNPOWDER PIRATE




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: February 06, 2008, 08:42:52 PM »

 Embarassed
Logged

Many good seamen go down the drain....I happen to be a lucky one

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

bluecrab
Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1002
Location: Hamilton VA Lovin' the country hon!





Ignore
« Reply #35 on: February 06, 2008, 08:56:47 PM »

>>The gravitational attraction between a 4 oz. crab and the lunar body approx. 239,000 miles away is effectively a constant zero. Therefore, there can be no lunar gravitational effect on crab molting.


I'm sorry Pinchy I must disagree. If a full moon can turn a human into a werewolf it most certainly can have an effect on a 4 oz crab.

:-)


~blue~
« Last Edit: February 06, 2008, 08:58:25 PM by bluecrab » Logged

I WILL get my boat out next year!
CRABGUY
Lifetime Member
Global Moderator
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6391
Location: CHESAPEAKE, VIRGINIA


FRYGUY


CRABMAN RUSS

« Reply #36 on: February 06, 2008, 09:20:01 PM »

   The Lunar Delusion - a final analysis
« on: Yesterday at 01:36:01 PM »   Quote


I do not mean to single out Jack - he is a fine person, writer, and waterman. But this post is a continuing example of confusion on this topic and it needs to be cleared up and disposed of.

Quote from: jack1747 on February 04, 2008, 05:23:50 PM
The fish didn't get her when she [shed] on the last full moon...

Fact: She did shed on the last full moon.

Kindly indulge my continuing effort to disabuse you of this fantastical connection between a moon and a shed. Let's examine this step-by-logical step:

1. Crabs do not shed in winter. To those of you who will claim something like, "oh they can't see the moon..." there is a simple reply:

Fact: Crabs shed all year long in warm climates.

a) How do you know they cannot see winter moonlight? Crabs burrow into the mud in the winter months but their antennae, eyes and mouthparts remain slightly above the surface bottom to maintain gill circulation. In the clear, cold, winter water some light would penetrate. Do you seriously imagine that a wintering crab "sees" a full moon, jumps up, and sheds her shell?

Fact: No one said crabs “see’s” a full moon.  We said crabs shed more on a full moon (cycle).  They do not see the moon in my basement.

b) As noted below, molting begins two full weeks before the shell is shed. Do you seriously imagine that a wintering crab is sitting on the bay floor, observing the lunar cycle, and anticipating the full moon?
Of course not, crabs do not shed in winter because they are in a hibernation state and their growth rate is slowed or stopped. Therefore the moon can have no effect.

Fact: Crabs do shed all year in warmer climates and in aquariums.

2. From a reproductive standpoint, it would be impossible for all or even most crabs to be shedding simultaneously. Since the female must be in a post-molt soft state to mate, the male by definition must be...er...in a hard state. Jokes aside, the male must possess a hard shell as he mates and protects the soft sook while fertilization takes place. If at every full moon every crab were molting, mating would never take place and the species would soon go extinct. Therefore the moon can have no effect.

Fact: No one said all the crabs shed on new or full moon cycles.  What is said is “More crabs shed on these cycles.”

3. Crabs do not suddenly molt; there are several physiological steps that take place before the final molt. For example, the preparatory "white sign" appears two weeks prior to molt. There are at least three possibilities for this development:
a) there is a biological imperative (i.e. the crab is growing) and a hormonal/mechanical process intitiates.
b) the crab "knows" that a full moon will appear in two weeks, and the crab begins her undressing process 14 days before the ball.
c) assuming the moon has anything to do with molting, since we have learned that molting begins 14 days prior, perhaps it is the waxing moon to blame for the molt, and not the full moon.
Which of these three, a), b), or c), do you seriously believe is actually the cause of molting?

Since we are assuming things now, let us assume that the whole Pocomoke sound reaches 50 degree’s within a day or two.  Could we assume then that all the crabs there would be triggered to begin actives at about the same time?  Bringing them into pre-molt about the same time, based on equal amounts of food? 

Fact: The first peeler run on the Pocomoke Sound is the first new moon or full moon cycle after the water reaches 60 degrees or so.  


4. It is an indisputable fact that even during the full moon, you can catch crabs in all states of shell hardness. Therefore, the moon cannot be the sole influence (if at all) on crab molting.

Fact: You do catch “crabs in all states of shell hardness”.  Just you catch more peelers During the full and new moon cycles.  Less hard crabs cause the males are looking for the Sally’s.
 
5. It is an indisputable fact that crabs shed at different rates depending on age and size. [Jack and others with fish tanks can easily test this: place one, two, three, four, five and six-inch crabs together and observe rates of molting. Of course, there is the risk of cannibalistic crustaceicide with this arrangement, so try the experiment in separate tanks if possible.] Of course, this homemade observation is unnecessary as the literature is clear on this point: the molting rate is an energy-dependent process which is only begun as a physiological imperative, i.e. the crab would not survive unless he grows into a new shell. This happens weekly when young, and bi or tri-monthly when older. Therefore, the moon can have no effect.

Fact: I have been keeping crabs in aquariums since, well more than a half century.  First one I remember was in a gallon pickle jar.  Since then “MY” aquarium kept crabs have shed more often on a full moon than not.  Year around.  Many times in rooms without windows.

6. Even assuming the lunar theory, what can the cause possibly be? What evolutionary process could have caused the blue crab to gain an advantage by shedding on the full moon? If you believe the reflected light is the answer, why would a crab wish to expose his soft shell to predators, including other crabs, when the night light is brightest? Crabs try to hide when molting, maximum exposure would be fatal rather than protective. Well, maybe you imagine there is some gravitational cause...but you forget that the moon is always there regardless of how much light is reflected and whether you can see it or not. The gravitational attraction between a 4 oz. crab and the lunar body approx. 239,000 miles away is effectively a constant zero. Therefore, there can be no lunar gravitational effect on crab molting.

Fact: During these lunar cycles we experience “spring tides”.  The is more habitat available to support more sloughs.  More places to hide.  Walk the salt marshes after a spring tide and you will (used to) find crabs way back up in the marsh grasses.

7. You have neglected to consider the most likely answer to this delusion: the anthropocentric fallacy which causes all of us to mistake our biased observations for causality. We see the small proportion of crabs in our traps, pots, pilings which are shedding; we do not see the millions of others which are not shedding. Like primitive peoples who thought that their dances brought rain and didn't realize that their propitious storm formed many days prior and many miles away, we forget that crabs begin molting two weeks before the full moon peeks out (there is an example of anthropomorphism - the moon doesn't "peek" even if we like to imagine it does). We see more or fewer crabs in the traps, and imagine all sorts of reasons why this is so: rain or no rain, luck or lack of it, wind or no wind, a moon with more or less sunlight bouncing off it. All of these old wives' tales can be fun to bandy about, but there comes a time when grown men have to accept reproducible scientific tests, facts

“anthropocentric fallacy “ What ever that means.

“We see the small proportion of crabs in our traps, pots, pilings which are shedding;”  Does that mean “You” see more shedders in your traps?

Question:  How many peeler pots do you fish?  How many have you pulled in your life time?  How often do you fish peeler pots? Do you hard crab pot?

Fact: It is a lot different what one see in a trap, hand line, or trot line vs. what is observed in pots.  They go in and usually don’t go out.

YOU TELL HIM BROTHER!
Logged
Pinchy
Registered User

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 979
Location: Center City, Philadelphia


Instructions: Hunt, fish, crab - rinse and repeat.




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: February 07, 2008, 11:11:25 AM »

Wow. Jack, again I don't mean to single you out, but can't you understand that this belief derives from the same source as astrology? If not the sun's reflection, or gravitational forces, what is it that you imagine is impelling a tiny arthropod's biological behavior? Magical moonbeams? What else? Can't you see how silly this appears, along with the delusions of gypsy fortune-tellers and astrological psychics?

Final rebuttal, and I give up (cue applause): laugh

1. Crabs do not shed in winter. To those of you who will claim something like, "oh they can't see the moon..." there is a simple reply:

Fact: Crabs shed all year long in warm climates.

[This is the whole point! The crab molt is a factor of temperature and food supply, not the moon!]

a) How do you know they cannot see winter moonlight? Crabs burrow into the mud in the winter months but their antennae, eyes and mouthparts remain slightly above the surface bottom to maintain gill circulation. In the clear, cold, winter water some light would penetrate. Do you seriously imagine that a wintering crab "sees" a full moon, jumps up, and sheds her shell?

Fact: No one said crabs “sees” a full moon.  We said crabs shed more on a full moon (cycle).  They do not see the moon in my basement.

[OK, if the crab cannot see moonlight, what is the force you conceive is acting upon the crab?]

4. It is an indisputable fact that even during the full moon, you can catch crabs in all states of shell hardness. Therefore, the moon cannot be the sole influence (if at all) on crab molting.

Fact: You do catch “crabs in all states of shell hardness”.  Just you catch more peelers During the full and new moon cycles.  Less hard crabs cause the males are looking for the Sally’s.

[Exactly. The hard males are still there, you just don't see as many because they are...er...busy with other things. Smiley That should prove to you that the moon is irrelevant, or these males would be busy shedding instead of...er...shagging. laugh ]

Fact: During these lunar cycles we experience “spring tides”.  The is more habitat available to support more sloughs.  More places to hide.  Walk the salt marshes after a spring tide and you will (used to) find crabs way back up in the marsh grasses.
 
[Let's have total agreement on this. But this only proves that more shedders can be observed by the inherently biased viewer simply because the crabs are more accessible.]

Question:  How many peeler pots do you fish?  How many have you pulled in your life time?  How often do you fish peeler pots? Do you hard crab pot?

[I used to spend entire summers on Long Island, crabbing the creeks and bays on the southern shore. We used wire ring handlines baited with killies, gigged eels, and we scooped softshells every day because my aunt really knew how to cook them. But this too is merely a personal anecdote - not evidence - to support the biological/physiological/physical facts discussed at length in the first post. BTW I accept your invitation to join you on a pot run - please bmail me when you can have me over, and thanks. Cheesy ]

A wonderful description of the molting process was written to me by another member in a Bmail: the best way to think of the crab shed is the way children change clothes - when they outgrow them, they need a larger size, and not before. A crab will not shed unless she is growing, period, and the moon has nothing to do with this plainly physiological process. Cheesy
« Last Edit: February 07, 2008, 11:25:50 AM by Pinchy » Logged

Please pack your trash out, pick up others', and leave your fishing spot cleaner than when you found it.
tattoo
Lifetime Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 78476
Location: Glassboro NJ.


MY BOAT CRAB TRAP


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #38 on: February 07, 2008, 11:18:57 AM »

Not again.  Undecided  laugh laugh laugh laugh
Logged

A CRAB A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY.   

Click Here To Mount Your Crab
bluecrab
Member
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1002
Location: Hamilton VA Lovin' the country hon!





Ignore
« Reply #39 on: February 07, 2008, 11:52:22 AM »

I love softshells they sure are yummy.  mmmm on a kaiser  some mayo and a merlin tomater.
Shoot. Just eat it as is yummm ME.

~blue~
Logged

I WILL get my boat out next year!

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 6   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
 
Home
 
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder


Google visited last this page May 21, 2019, 11:07:08 PM