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Author Topic: Value-added production of crab shell  (Read 8648 times)
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Green Crab Man
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« on: November 03, 2008, 01:30:17 PM »

-Whats kinds of different processing methods are available if I wanted to use the flour of a crabs shell in value-added products like pasta or something of the sort?
- Does anyone have knowladge of chemical or enzymatic constituants that may be used to "soften" gritty texture of crab shell?
-What kinds of value-added products are on the market today using total product utilization of crab?

Any disscusion of these topics would be appreciated. I'm looking for new ideas to utilize the invasive green crab.
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Dreampixels
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« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2008, 02:15:32 PM »

-Whats kinds of different processing methods are available if I wanted to use the flour of a crabs shell in value-added products like pasta or something of the sort?
- Does anyone have knowladge of chemical or enzymatic constituants that may be used to "soften" gritty texture of crab shell?
-What kinds of value-added products are on the market today using total product utilization of crab?

Any disscusion of these topics would be appreciated. I'm looking for new ideas to utilize the invasive green crab.

I have never heard of using the crab shells directly, here in Pa we catch the crab, steam it, eat it and discard the shells into a compost pit or directly on the garden, grow corn, catch more crabs, eat em and grow more corn.

I think they make good pickins fer the chickens too.

Sorry Smiley
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horsefly
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« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2008, 02:32:53 PM »

-Whats kinds of different processing methods are available if I wanted to use the flour of a crabs shell in value-added products like pasta or something of the sort?
- Does anyone have knowladge of chemical or enzymatic constituants that may be used to "soften" gritty texture of crab shell?
-What kinds of value-added products are on the market today using total product utilization of crab?

Any disscusion of these topics would be appreciated. I'm looking for new ideas to utilize the invasive green crab.
Not sure how that would be done...first off crab shells and waste on a commercial level are dehydrated in a large furnace. Then they are ground up in a pulverizer hammermill. So in theory that is your flour....it is used in animal feed products IE; dogs,cats,chickens and hogs. The other percent of it goes into fertilizer. I am certain the way it smells during the dehydration period, you wouldn't want to add to your food. There is methods to preserving the shell however using chemicals, the preserved shell is frozen for later use only for dishes a deviled crabs etc. If you want to make crab stock, do as you would for shrimp...add the shells etc from your picked over carcass, add veggies if so desired and enough liquid.....simmer for a bit and strain thru a sieve or cheese cloth to remove shells/bone. Use asap or freeze.
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« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2008, 03:45:11 PM »

JM Clayton in Cambridge, MD uses all parts of the crab.  They make a byproduct paste called Bader Meat (named after the machine that rolls it), which is the guts and shells ground up and rolled into a pasty, tan-colored loaf.  They sell this stuff to restaurants as flavor enhancer and soup stock.  Mike Rowe sampled the stuff when he was there. Grin They also sell the shells and guts in a dried form that is used for fertilizer.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2008, 05:27:58 PM by Seaweed » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2008, 03:51:09 PM »

JM Clayton in Cambridge, MD uses all parts of the crab.  They make a byproduct paste called Bader Meat (named after the machine that rolls it), which is the guts and shells ground up and rolled into a pasty, tan-colored loaf.  These sell this stuff to restaurants as flavor enhanced and soup stock.  Mike Rowe sampled the stuff when he was there. Grin They also sell the shells and guts in a dried form that is used for fertilizer.

The Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs? That's a funny show. I don't think I've seen that one. Any idea which season it was on?
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Seaweed
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« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2008, 03:59:40 PM »

The Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs? That's a funny show. I don't think I've seen that one. Any idea which season it was on?

Yes.  I don't know which season it is.  He goes out trotlining with a guy on the same show, and they don't catch many Grin
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« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2008, 04:07:31 PM »

Don't they scientifically name the shell contents as chitin? I do remember some group doing a lot of experiments for it's potential uses.
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Crab A Lot
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« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2008, 04:30:52 PM »



      Google blue crab shells used for and click on Substance in Blue Crab Shells is Key to Nanosensor.

      I also heard that the crab shell are use in medicine cosaminDS joint health supplement which has Glucosamine and Chondoitin.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2008, 04:41:33 PM by Crab A Lot » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2008, 04:41:50 PM »

Don't they scientifically name the shell contents as chitin? I do remember some group doing a lot of experiments for it's potential uses.
I need to look it up, but you're on the right path. I think it is used for some sort of vitamin or supplement might even be a aphrodiact. Magazine article from our research archive:
   Process turns crab shells into Chitosan
Article from: Chemical Engineering Progress Article date: March 1, 1999 Author: Anonymous More results for: crab shells used for chitosin | Copyright informationCopyright American Institute of Chemical Engineers Mar 1999. Provided by ProQuest LLC. (Hide copyright information) 

Crab shells can be turned into chitosan by a new process developed by researchers at Clemson University, Clemson, SC, who worked with South Carolina Crab Co., McClellanville.

Drs. Ronald L. Thomas and Robert F. Testin at Clemson have developed a patented, closed-loop system that extracts the remaining food-grade meat from the shells, then reduces them to their primary materials, D. chitin and calcium, with no discharge of product into the environment.

The ...

Read all of this article with a FREE trial
I knew that sounded familiar....Eddy Gordon was the owner of South Carolina Crab(before he sold to developers) I remember he worked with the group of scientists back then on that.
and here's your nanosensor http://www.primidi.com/2006/07/30.html
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Lots of crabbers and crab lovers on here. If you enjoy crabs, lot's of info and good chat about crabs. Why not go ahead and donate to this forum. Deep down after doing research on here and chatting with others,you will find useful info from some new friends.ENJOY!!
Dreampixels
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« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2008, 07:53:30 PM »


      Google blue crab shells used for and click on Substance in Blue Crab Shells is Key to Nanosensor.

      I also heard that the crab shell are use in medicine cosaminDS joint health supplement which has Glucosamine and Chondoitin.

Does this mean I am going to need a crabbing license and a prescription from the doctor to go crabbing next year?
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I wish to die like my father did, in his "sleep" - unlike the screaming passengers aboard the plane he was piloting.

There are no passengers on spaceship earth. We are all crew.    Marshall McLuhan
.
Aviation in itself is not inherently dangerous. But to an even greater degree than the sea, it is terribly unforgiving of any carelessness, incapacity or neglect.

Captain A. G. Lamplugh

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« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2008, 09:06:48 PM »

WELCOME aboard . i toss my shells in the compost pile.  Wink
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Crab A Lot
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« Reply #11 on: November 04, 2008, 08:29:46 PM »

Does this mean I am going to need a crabbing license and a prescription from the doctor to go crabbing next year?


   Only if you have arthitic knees or hips Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin devilish devilish devilish
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Chesapeake Bay Crabs are the best!!!!!!!!
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« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2008, 12:22:02 AM »

I use em for crab stock, like hosefly said. Use the liquid as a base for your soups or crab sauce
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Green Crab Man
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« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2008, 08:57:28 PM »

The process of converting chitin into chitosan is called N-deacetylation. There are ways of removing the calcium contituants, but they harsh methods and not very eco-friendly.
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