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Author Topic: Wye River 07-11-10 / Lost trot line  (Read 9850 times)
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crabberone
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« on: July 11, 2010, 11:54:00 AM »

Started crabbing in afternoon no luck at all.   Also lost a trot line on right river heading about half mile past the bridge.  It should on the left side and has one buoy on the one end.  It is painted john deere yellow.  Was picking up and dropped one end of line went to the other end and the buoy was no where to be seen--don't know if it got caught in a branch or what.  If somebody happens to see it it would be greatly appreciated if you could contact me.  Phone # 302-382-2335.
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crabberone
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« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2010, 11:55:08 AM »

Posted wrong date.   This occurred on 07-10-10.
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Captain Seaweed
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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2010, 02:13:32 PM »

Did you pull your line up from the bouy that was still there or did they both go under. And how deep were you.
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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2010, 02:17:20 PM »

You can try to drag your anchor across it a few times to try and snag it.  Hopefully you can get it back. Good luck.
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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2010, 05:13:22 PM »

I had this happen last year with a short line. Took off 1 buoy so that when i went to the other it would be easier to pull up and went to the other side and the buoy was under about a foot and turns out the line just before the chain got snagged on an old bushel basket and when i was taking the one buoy off i must have been drifting and it was enough to pull it under. I lucked out though and found it thanks to gps. Im sure your snag will pull free and its probably floating out there unless someone picked it up.
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« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2010, 05:19:30 PM »

Like TugCapt said, drag something accross the area and see if you can snag it. Either an anchor or make something thats will be able to snag it.
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eggsniffer
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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2010, 06:15:22 PM »

Oh man, I'm sorry to hear that.  The EXACT same thing happened to me at the wye yesterday.  I pulled under both floats when tightening the line.  I managed to get mine back dragging a danforth anchor.  I'm gonna have to go with bigger floats and a longer anchor lead...

Hope it works out for you
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crabberone
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« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2010, 08:27:30 AM »

I was in 10-12ft depth.  I was crabbing near another boat and he was going back yesterday(Sunday).  I gave him my phone number to call me if he saw it.  I have not heard anything so either he did not see it or did not go.  Looks like I am going to go and try dragging the bottom. 

Thanks for the help on ideas for dragging the bottom.
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« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2010, 11:33:51 AM »

I have dropped my trot-line probably 5-6 times down at the Wye.  I always keep a grappling hook in the boat and got lucky everytime, bringing them back up.  I might head to the Wye tomorrow, but usually don't get down past the bridge.  If I do spot something, I will let you know.
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Dreampixels
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« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2010, 11:51:43 AM »


I have never done this - once I did drop in too deep of water on one end and had to run back to the other to pick the line up. However I must ask what size floats and weights are you fellows using - since then for the past 15 or so years I have been using 5 gal buckets which would take a ton of weight to sink them - just curious - maybe I am just lucky or have not have the right conditions yet.
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« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2010, 12:29:11 PM »

I have never done this - once I did drop in too deep of water on one end and had to run back to the other to pick the line up. However I must ask what size floats and weights are you fellows using - since then for the past 15 or so years I have been using 5 gal buckets which would take a ton of weight to sink them - just curious - maybe I am just lucky or have not have the right conditions yet.

I wonder how much weight, size of jugs and the length of the control lines.  I have never had this happen in all the years I have run line.
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« Reply #11 on: July 12, 2010, 12:39:56 PM »

I wonder how much weight, size of jugs and the length of the control lines.  I have never had this happen in all the years I have run line.

D if my memory servers me correctly you crab some rather deep water with a line correct? I normally stay in 10 to 12 ft at the deepest - however you are getting me all excited about going deep - how long are your control lines - mine are about 25 or 30 ft.
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I wish to die like my father did, in his "sleep" - unlike the screaming passengers aboard the plane he was piloting.

There are no passengers on spaceship earth. We are all crew.    Marshall McLuhan
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Aviation in itself is not inherently dangerous. But to an even greater degree than the sea, it is terribly unforgiving of any carelessness, incapacity or neglect.

Captain A. G. Lamplugh
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« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2010, 01:28:47 PM »

D if my memory servers me correctly you crab some rather deep water with a line correct? I normally stay in 10 to 12 ft at the deepest - however you are getting me all excited about going deep - how long are your control lines - mine are about 25 or 30 ft.

I have 100' - 50' from the weight to the float and 50' from the float to the chain.  I keep the lines on all summer even when I'm in 4' of water.  Even before I put the longer lines on, I still had 40' -50' on all my lines.
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"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, a crab in one hand, a beer in the other, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- WOW--What a Ride!"
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« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2010, 05:17:14 PM »

Me also  Smiley
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Mr. Breeze
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« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2010, 06:05:50 PM »

Oh man, I'm sorry to hear that.  The EXACT same thing happened to me at the wye yesterday.  I pulled under both floats when tightening the line.  I managed to get mine back dragging a danforth anchor.  I'm gonna have to go with bigger floats and a longer anchor lead...

Hope it works out for you

MD regs require a buoy at each end of the trotline which are alike and at least 12" in diameter.  How big were yours?  Seems like it would take quite a bit to sink a 12" dia. buoy.

http://www.dsd.state.md.us/comar/comarhtml/08/08.02.03.03.htm

section F
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« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2010, 08:32:25 AM »

I have to ask.  Why is it easier to pull the line in without the bouy on the far end.  Even when I used to pull by hand, I'd start at one end and pick the anchor and bouy up and then run just around the line a little and then back over top.  Then stay over the line and pull it up as it loops just behind the boat.  The far bouy gives you something to aim at and helps you stay over the line.  It is so much easier than pulling from the front.  The couple of crabs you might dip while pulling the line from the front of the boat is nothing compared to making it easier on your self.  

Of course now with the winder, I still use the same technique but it is so much easier.  D-rings on the bouys, unclip and the winder will bring up the anchors to the side of the boat.  You guys can have pulling by hand.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2010, 08:37:50 AM by Big Liar » Logged

Just one of the few bad apples that keeps wizzing in the MSSA's and TF's milk.  Not because I have violations (because I don't'), but because I'm catching the resources that they claim to own and have more rights to.
crabberone
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« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2010, 09:46:05 AM »

I think my lead lines are to short but this is the first time I had this problem and been crabbing at Wye last three years.    My buoys are same on each end and at least 12 inches dia(me& a buddy have 2 separate lines set up w/ them).   If the weather holds out I am heading out tomorrow to see if there is any sight of it.   Should'nt be much traffic w/ no crabbing going on tomorrow.

Going to buy a grappling hook.
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eggsniffer
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« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2010, 04:09:26 PM »

MD regs require a buoy at each end of the trotline which are alike and at least 12" in diameter.  How big were yours?  Seems like it would take quite a bit to sink a 12" dia. buoy.
(COMAR LINK)

section F

My floats are 8" x 14".  I would like to take this opportunity to turn myself in.  Perhaps you can make an internet citizen's arrest?  Or maybe we can petition the DNR to make a special ruling on "average diameter" and clarify things for us who use non spherical floats. 

I'm going with new floats though, and my control lines were certainly too short.  Trial and error!  I've caught a lot of crabs with that setup, but it definitely needs adjusting after reading the non COMAR posts.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2010, 04:11:15 PM by eggsniffer » Logged
dfran
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« Reply #18 on: July 13, 2010, 04:19:15 PM »

My floats are 8" x 14".  I would like to take this opportunity to turn myself in.  Perhaps you can make an internet citizen's arrest?  Or maybe we can petition the DNR to make a special ruling on "average diameter" and clarify things for us who use non spherical floats.  

I'm going with new floats though, and my control lines were certainly too short.  Trial and error!  I've caught a lot of crabs with that setup, but it definitely needs adjusting after reading the non COMAR posts.

The regs already address the size of the floats if they aren't spherical, I think they need to be 10" x 12". Read the rules again I know it's in there.

Found it!

F. Float Requirements.

(1) A trotline shall have a float of the same color, size, and shape attached to each end.

(2) Floats that have a round or spherical shape shall be at least 12 inches in diameter.

(3) Floats that do not have a round or spherical shape shall be at least 12 inches long and 10 inches wide.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2010, 04:24:28 PM by dfran » Logged
eggsniffer
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« Reply #19 on: July 13, 2010, 04:43:53 PM »

Oh man, I'm going to the slammer for sure Tongue

In all seriousness, there's few things more disheartening than dropping your control anchor and watching your float disappear.  Worse when you could avoid it with longer lines and a bigger float.  So I'm probably going to go with the 5 gal orange "homer bucket" approach.  Do you guys seal the buckets or are they fairly airtight when you put the lids on them?
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