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Author Topic: Marine bacteria infection  (Read 75645 times)
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Dirichlet
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« Reply #20 on: July 08, 2015, 12:15:11 PM »

I keep Purell sanitizer in the boat whenever I'm crabbing.  Any time I handle the line or old/used bait, or any time I get a little scrape, cut, or puncture, I douse the he*l out of it with the hand sanitizer.  So far, so good... (knock on wood)
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rdbeard
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« Reply #21 on: July 09, 2015, 07:53:46 AM »

 Bleach and water 50/50 use on any cut ,scrape or poke while on the water.
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ralphrepo
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« Reply #22 on: July 19, 2015, 08:53:02 AM »

I know this is an old thread, but the thing that one has to come away with after reading it is that sometimes, an innocent pleasure such as being out with family and friends participating in a cherished activity like crabbing can cost one's life. It's important to remember that the milieu of crabs and seafood in general, is also a dynamic and huge reservoir for all kinds of vicious bacteria. In fact, one doesn't even need to get "bit" as the parlance goes; any opening through the skin provides ample chance for opportunistic germs to enter the body. Routinely, simple abrasions, a scraped knee, cutting cuticles too close; whatever, can provide an entry point for staph skin infections on a daily basis. Move that skin vulnerability into marsh or open water, or handle crabs (in the market, your kitchen, or throwing out raw crabs in the trash) is enough to provide potential infectious exposure.

Hence, the signs of trouble aren't necessary the severity of the skin break mechanism, but rather the time frame of symptom progression. If that big Jimmy got revenge and clamped down hard on your thumb for a real nice one before going into the pot, then it may appear serious as you're dripping copious blood in with the Old Bay. While the paper cut you got on your finger yesterday which isn't even bleeding anymore, may not even be on your radar. Both however, provides the perfect chance for bacteria to invade. Carrying and using topical disinfectants, like bleach, soaps, et cetera, is fine. But critically, using the space between your ears is the best defense.

Whether on the water or on dry land, be alert for common symptoms like redness (or any discoloration), swelling, pain; and most importantly, the rapid progression of symptoms. If one notices a bit of redness and inflammation at one location, but then an hour later, it had spread to the surrounding tissues by a good two or three inches; another hour and not only has it spread but now it's feeling numb or pain that didn't even seem possible at first; then that's potentially a fast moving infection. Stop whatever you're doing (don't even bother going home to change or put your gear away), get to a hospital Emergency Department immediately.

The best that could happen is, one ruins an outing out of an abundance of caution. The worst is that a potentially life or limb threatening symptom is ignored and one has to suffer a tragic consequence. Here's two links for those have have an interest in this to continue reading. Good luck and stay safe out there.

Cheers!

http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/skin-disorders/bacterial-skin-infections/overview-of-bacterial-skin-infections
http://www.cdc.gov/features/necrotizingfasciitis/

 
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 08:58:36 AM by ralphrepo » Logged
saltysenior
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« Reply #23 on: July 29, 2015, 11:31:56 AM »


   i can not paste it but a guy in ft.pierce fl. died 2 days after getting finned by a fish...this happened about 7/22/'15
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SimplyBlueCrabs
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« Reply #24 on: September 12, 2015, 12:58:23 PM »

I know this is an old post, but anyone involved in water-related activities should be aware of the rare but sometimes disastrous, sometimes fatal, potential for Vibrio bacterial infection from water-associated activities (or raw oyster ingestion).
In addition to being a blue crab/seafood fan, I am a (retired) board-certified emergency physician, with a special interest in Hazardous Marine Animals (HMA). The following is an excerpt from an article on our website about HMA in NC, but it pertains to the US in general, as well.
http://www.aviancetaceanpress.com/ACPress/Hazardous_Marine_Animals_of_the_Carolina_Coast.html

MARINE ACQUIRED WOUNDS

Wounds can ensue from contact with many different marine animals or objects. Stepping on an oyster shell or sea urchin, getting pinched by a crab, puncturing oneself while cleaning fish or shrimp, or cutting one’s hand while opening shellfish are but a few possible injuries.
Contrary to widely held belief, salt water is not a sterile, germ-free medium. Bacteria are present, but the species are different from land types. Over 20 marine species are known to cause disease in humans.
Marine-acquired wounds are, in fact, somewhat prone to infection. Infection is more likely for at least three reasons: 1) Wounds are often contaminated with grit and foreign debris — foreign material of any type increases chances of infection. 2) Sting wounds can cause loss of blood supply and tissue death at the injured site; sometimes, spines break off in wounds. 3) Any type of bite wound, whether from land or marine animal, is heavily contaminated with mouth germs.
If an infection develops from marine contact, seek medical care promptly. A medical caregiver treating the infection should be informed that the wound is marine-acquired: Specific antibiotics are required to kill marine bacteria (standard antibiotics used in land-acquired injuries may not work).
As with any wound, a tetanus shot is recommended within 72 hours if the injured person has not had a booster shot in the past ten years.
Immune-supressed individuals (those with liver disease, alcoholism, diabetes, AIDS, or receiving chemotherapy or steroid treatment) should be especially careful after cuts in the marine environment. Local wound infection with a germ called Vibrio vulnificus can spread rapidly through the whole body and cause death within one to two days.

Red bumps and itching rash are not typical symptoms of marine bacterial infection. More likely, "clammers itch" from larvae of flatworms, or "sea bathers eruption" from jellyfish larvae," or an allergic contact reaction, would cause those symptoms. Treatment would be with steroid cream, antihistamines, and, for severe itching/cases, oral steroids.
As ralphrepo noted above, the symptoms of Vibrio infection are redness, swelling, discoloration, and blistering in the area of a wound, that are often rapidly progressive. Your leg/arm/finger will feel and look like a grilled chicken leg. Attached is a photo, the leg of a Vibrio victim, who would like to let others know of the dangers of this rare but dangerous infection. This is what a Vibrio infection looks like.
Hope this helps. Keep crabbing, doing other water activities, eating seafood — good for you! But, be aware to take action if you do get a marine-associated infection.
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« Reply #25 on: March 11, 2017, 06:17:38 AM »

whoa! Thanks for this info. Had a friend of mine suffer the same thing. He thought it was just a minor wound. Left it for days not even washing it with soap until a huge pus formed around and inside the skin.
That's the time he felt the need to go to the doctor. The doctor said he's lucky if not they would have to amputate his leg if it was too late.
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