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Author Topic: Waiting for the salinity to lower  (Read 3798 times)
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carlosh
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« on: April 29, 2013, 09:50:28 PM »

After and extended season on "no rain", the salinity has gone through the roof.  You'd be hard pressed to find a crab around here.  The salinity reads around 40 ppt.  This site indicates that 3-15 ppt is the preferred range by crabs.  OK, let's suppose that we got abundant rain here and upstream in the water shed, and that the salinity dropped into the preferred range.  How long would it take the crab population to improve?  Months, a full season, years?  Huh

Carlos
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Hawkeye
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« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2013, 10:26:29 PM »

Maybe you're not measuring the salinity right?  are you using a hydrometer or refractometer?
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carlosh
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« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2013, 10:30:11 PM »

I'm using an "Instant Ocean" hydrometer.  Just to be sure, I read some distilled water and yes, it measured 0.  The issue really isn't measuring the salinity, it's the recovery process that I'm asking about.

Carlos
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Hawkeye
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2013, 10:46:01 PM »

I'm using an "Instant Ocean" hydrometer.  Just to be sure, I read some distilled water and yes, it measured 0.  The issue really isn't measuring the salinity, it's the recovery process that I'm asking about.

Carlos

Hydrometers are not accurate.  Use it for a gut check, but not to report actual figures- especially when 5 ppt means the difference between normal and too salty.  A refractometer will remove all doubt.  I'd lend you mine but i think you're like 2000 miles away...lol.

The ocean is normally around 35pt.  Given that a single air bubble attached to the hydrometer handle will throw it off by 3 or 5ppt, you may just be getting completely off numbers.

if it is indeed at 40ppt, then the recovery is based on how long it will be before heavy precipitation occurs.  But i defer to the veterans on this board to help answer your question. 




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carlosh
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« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2013, 11:18:00 PM »

I hear what you're saying about using a refractometer and I agree with its accuracy.  Unfortunately, I don't want to spend that kind of money.  The salinity level is high, that's a fact.  I spoke with SwimmerL (who frequents this site).  He is a medical doctor and is fairly knowledgeable in that area.  He also tells me that the salinity is quite high.  I understand what you're saying about a bubble on the floating indicator.  I was very careful to ensure that there weren't any on the many measurements I've taken.  Even if there was a bubble and threw the measurement off by 5, the ideal salinity is still way off.  If ideal is 3 to 15 and I'm reading 40 ppt, I'm at least 25 ppt away.  That's quite far to have been affected by a bubble, don't you think?

Carlos
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