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Author Topic: Willing to TRADE Dungeness and Red Rocks for Blues...  (Read 11737 times)
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msmaggie
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« on: October 19, 2005, 09:25:09 AM »

Hey all from Seattle Washington!

Originally from the East Coast and spent many an hour crabbing for blues...  Now, out here in the Pacific Northwest and have some lovely crabs up here but MISS the taste of "home".

Willing to trade my Dungeness and/or Red Rocks for Blues.  I go crabbing about twice a week and usually catch my limit of Dungeness, (6...  but at roughly 2- 2 1/2 pounds a piece its a LOT of crab!)

I'll ship on my end, you ship on yours.

Anyone interested?

Lovely to have found this forum.
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msmaggie
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« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2005, 09:44:29 AM »

I'll tell you...  I shouldn't post at 6:30 in the morning!  Geesh!  Forgot to mention that the shipment would be 6 dung, (limit) and 6 red rock. 
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CSKIFF517
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« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2005, 10:39:10 AM »

So how do you catch the dungeness.  Do you use traps?  How far out do you have to go to catch them?  I always imagined they were caught by big commercial crabbers going out far with the huge crab pots.  Never realized any rec. crabber could catch them.  Thats awesome.     
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« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2005, 10:49:20 AM »

sorry ms maggie, but we can get dungeness here on the east coast, they are frozen, but they are available.  im surprised you are not able to get blues out your way....i'm surprised you are not asking for a hoagie too!!!   Grin  Grin  Grin
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msmaggie
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« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2005, 10:50:42 AM »

They are VERY similiar to catching blues in certain regards and VERY easy to catch.  While chicking necking doesn't work.  I use a hoop net with a bait cage, (I use chicken wings in the cage MUST reinforce well since octopus will steal your bait if you don't reinforce), in the bottom.  Using the hoop net off the pier you fling it like a large frisbee out as far as you can and let it set for about 10-15 minutes and pull it out. I use 3 hoops at a time and usually limit within 2 hours on my dungeness and red rocks within that amount of time.  I'll take a look and see if I've got some pics for you.

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msmaggie
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« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2005, 10:52:30 AM »

sorry ms maggie, but we can get dungeness here on the east coast, they are frozen, but they are available.  im surprised you are not able to get blues out your way....i'm surprised you are not asking for a hoagie too!!!   Grin  Grin  Grin

OH...  I can get blues if I want to pay 200.00 a bushel!   And I KNOW you can get dung's out there too  AT FIFTEEN TO TWENTY bucks a piece  Grin
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daisycupy
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« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2005, 11:13:16 AM »

They are VERY similar to catching blues in certain regards and VERY easy to catch.  While chicking necking doesn't work.  I use a hoop net with a bait cage, (I use chicken wings in the cage MUST reinforce well since octopus will steal your bait if you don't reinforce), in the bottom.  Using the hoop net off the pier you fling it like a large frisbee out as far as you can and let it set for about 10-15 minutes and pull it out. I use 3 hoops at a time and usually limit within 2 hours on my dungeness and red rocks within that amount of time.  I'll take a look and see if I've got some pics for you.



would love to see some Dun pic's ......... used to catchem on Vancouver Island, Canada...... they were plentiful and easy to catch and loved going out crabbing with my brothers..... hard to imagine that they are $20 or more a piece omgoodnesssssss...... I have seen them in acme.... but sadly they don't look to fresh.... and truthfully the MD blue crab is so so much sweeter........... spoiled now..........
good luck with your blue crab quest........

 daisy
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msmaggie
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« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2005, 08:35:51 PM »

Hey Daisy!

I didn't have any pics hanging around, I just reformatted my computer and forgot they were "wiped"  but...  going on Saturday so will take pics then.

In the meantime to show this forum that crabbers are the same no matter how far away or what their particular "color" these crabby critters may be; I am going to take the opportunity to post this that a friend of mine who FINALLY after 35 years on this world posted on our "dungeness" forum,  I think it shows that no matter what you crab for you've gotta start somewhere.  I wish she had taken me and then some of the foibles that happened along the way wouldn't have happened to her but...  live and learn.  Also, it's a post for cskiff to show that yeah, we do catch the BIG ones out here!  The big RED ones anyway.  And NO females are allowed to be kept or you face MAJOR fines!

Reposted with her permission, Enjoy.

Titled:  My First Crabbing adventure.

On our second day in Newport, we woke up to unexpectedly glorious weather—one of those days where it’s hot out before 9am. I had seen crab rentals in the lobby and decided that today was the day I’d catch my first crab.

I didn’t have the first clue about crabbing other than what my friend Maggie had told me, (should have taken her advice and let her "show me the ropes" as it were, FIRST mistake!). I assumed we’d rent a crab ring in the morning, toss it into the water, go play and check on it the next day. The woman at the rental counter laughed and said if we did that we wouldn’t catch any crabs. I was confused—didn’t the crabs just walk into the trap and not come out? I had heard tales of crustacean cannibalism… maybe the crabs ate each other if they spent too much time in a confined area. Or maybe someone would steal our crabs if we left the ring unattended? We decided to check out the town first and then come back and spend the rest of the day crabbing.

We drove through Newport’s main street; it was touristy, as predicted, but also kind of cute and the perfect place for a family with young kids. We drove a little further and ended up on Historic Nye Beach. It was breathtaking… in more ways than one. The beach was unbelievably beautiful, but it also was unbelievably smelly. There were thousands of tiny, bright purple jellyfish washed up on the beach and rotting in the sun. When a jelly completely dried up it left behind a hard little disk, about the size of a half-dollar, and it looked like a translucent computer chip. I was fascinated with the jellyfish, but they smelled so bad that we had to leave.

On our way back we drove through the town of Nye Beach, which was the exact opposite of Newport’s tourist strip; upscale and understated. It was weird how different each area was, considering they’re less than a mile apart. In Nye Beach we stopped at the cutest little deli (Village Market & Deli) and purchased some delicious provolone and hard salami for lunch.

When we got back to the hotel, we changed into more appropriate crabbing attire and headed back down to the rental desk. I asked a million questions and finally figured out that the crab ring lies flat on the bottom of the water, so the crabs can walk in. Then when the ring is pulled to the surface, it forms a basket that catches the crabs. A crab ring is rented for a period of 24 hours ($8) and you can crab for as long as you want within that time period. The ring rental came with a large bucket and a green plastic ruler for measuring the crabs. We also had to purchase two crabbing licenses ($6.50 each) and I bought a pair of plastic coated gloves ($3) that I figured would come in handy. Now all we needed was bait. The brochure I picked up said that the bait should be as smelly as possible: our choices were chicken or mink. I assumed the mink would smell more than the chicken (an understatement), so we purchase a frozen mink (sans head, tail or feet) for $2.50. I calculated that we’d need to catch at least three crabs in order to break even since I had seen $15 fresh crabs for sale in town.

We headed out to the hotel’s private dock with our crabbing supplies, a bag of sour cream and onion potato chips and a few Rainers. I still wasn’t exactly sure what we were doing, but there was no one else on the dock to pepper with questions; we had to wing it. The first step was baiting our trap. I unwrapped the mink and was hit with a putrid smell—despite being frozen. Between one frozen mink and thousands of rotting jellyfish, the jellyfish are surprisingly better smelling. I was hoping I could get away with not touching the mink, but I couldn’t grip the string with the gloves. Holding my breath, I tied the mink to the bottom of the trap as quickly as I could. It ended up looking exactly like a giant, trussed pork loin.

We lowered the ring into the water, popped open our beers and discussed strategy. K wouldn’t touch the crabs, so we decided that she would pull up the ring and I would grab the crabs. And safety first; if K got nervous she was to ditch the ring back into the water. K asked what we’d do with the crabs that were under the allowed size of 5.75 inches. I said I’d gently place them in the water and they’d float back down to their home.

We were anxious and didn’t have a watch to tell if the recommended 20 minutes had passed (I’m pretty sure it was only 5), so we decided to pull up the ring and see what we had caught. K cautiously pulled up the net while I took pictures. I was thrilled to see that there were about six crabs in our net! Most of them were under the required size—so small that they could crawl through the net and onto the dock. We didn’t account for this in our strategy, so some excitement ensued. I ended up running around the ring, herding the escaped crabs back into the water while K screamed and pointed when they got loose. Finally we were left with one, giant crab. Just as I was getting ready to put it into our bucket, we remembered that we had to check the sex (you’re only allowed to keep male crabs). I flipped it over and was crushed to find it was a female. Before putting it back in the water, I wanted a picture of me holding my first crab. K was getting the camera when I felt a hard pinch through the gloves. I screamed at the top of my lungs and hurled the crab back into the water, screaming “It BIT me! That f*cker BIT me!” while K laughed. Our first pull was a bust, so we lowered the crab ring back into the water.

Each subsequent pull yielded many more little crabs, but also a few male ones that were large enough to keep. We learned that tossing the ring as far out as we could returned better crabs. I also learned that gently placing the crabs back in the water is neither wise nor practical. I quickly realized how vicious and strong crabs are and I ended up throwing them off the dock as quickly as I could. One crab was holding on so tightly that I couldn’t get him to budge. I was pulling on him as hard as I could while Kelly tried to saw off the piece of mink he was clutching with the ruler (didn’t work).

On the fifth or sixth pull, K pointedly informed me that she couldn’t do this anymore. I was confused since she seemed to be holding up pretty well. Finally she pointed at the mink. Oh. The crabs had gotten to the mink insides. I told her not to look and that I’d take care of it. Ahem. Could I really do this? Our mink meat was about a foot and a half long and at least two feet of intestines were hanging out. All I needed to do was pull the guts out and get rid of them so it didn’t look so gruesome. I pulled. And pulled—all the while screaming at K not to look. She’d die if she saw what I was seeing.

I don’t think degutting an animal can be compared to anything else in life. The best I can say is that it was like pulling a tissue out of a brand-new Kleenex box. I mean, there’s not much resistance, but you do have to tug a little and the sound is not so pretty. I was losing my nerve, but I figured if I didn’t do this, K couldn’t go on—and she was already being an incredible sport considering she’s doesn’t even eat seafood. I kept screaming at K not to look as I yanked and yanked. About five feet of intestines came out and with one last tug, came free. Whew! Then I realized the guts were entwined in the net. “Don’t look!” I screamed. I was slightly hysterical at this point, partly because I was feeling queasy and partly because I thought it was hilarious that we were making such an incredible scene.

After a brief struggle, I got the intestines unwound from the net and tossed them into the water. “I got it! I got it! Oh, NOOOOO! Wait… don’t look… uh… we have a problem…” I’m practically doubled over with laughter at this point. "The guts FLOAT... don’t look!” I was trying to figure out how to make the intestines sink when an entire flock of seagulls swooped down on me. I hit the deck and covered my head for protection. I was combination screaming, crying and laughing “Oh my god! Oh my god! Oh my god!” while two gulls grabbed the entrails on each side and I watched a horrifying and much less romantic version of the lady and the tramp spaghetti scene. I almost lost my lunch, but at least the entrails were finally gone.

We stayed out for almost three hours and caught eight crabs total; five Dungeness and three Red Rock. The Red Rock crabs were a beautiful dark reddish color with bright purple highlights on their claws. The Dungeness just looked yummy. We fired up the crab pots located on the upper deck and relaxed in the sun with another well-deserved beer. Once our crabs were cooked and bright red, I covered them with ice and brought them back to our room. I shelled for about three hours that night and ended up with about 6 cups of crab meat. I melted a 1/2 stick of butter and dug in. It was the sweetest crab I’ve ever eaten.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2005, 08:40:36 PM by msmaggie » Logged
JIMMYCRAB
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« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2005, 10:21:13 PM »

I might be interested., catching great crabs right now.not sure if the shipping charges are worth it . Shipped a dozen to Va a few weeks ago. Weighed 16# and cost over $50. cant imagine what they would have cost to send to Wa. Never had red rock but i love dungeness. Do you want them live or steamed???Not Quite sure you can ship them live or if they would survive the trip.  I'd be happy to steam them so they arive fit to eat. These are the best crabs I've seen all year but they wont last much longer. Going out again Monday. Let me know. --JC



                                      CATCH OF THE DAY
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Smoked carp tastes just as good as smoked salmon .....when you don't have any smoked salmon.
msmaggie
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« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2005, 07:06:43 PM »

mrs.m come to the xmas party and we will give you all the blue crab your heart could desire. Grin

Uhhh huuu....  Yeah, right  Tongue   And just where are you planning to get blues in December?  Planning on having them shipped from the gulf?

Also, it's Ms. , not Mrs.  Been divorced for years.  Miss is even better....  just not "Missy" bow.

I've also got to tell you all that I am thoroughly impressed with this forum.  So many wonderful posts and pics.  Lovely!  I look forward to meeting you all someday next year when I go home for my hiatus.

Especially like The "Mumbo" clap that draws all those bushels into baskets.  AND, I've got to find out the recipe for JoeCrabs "red sauce" was perusing earlier today and while the kitchen was a mess the crabs looked absolutely SCRUMPTIOUS!

Even if I can't find a "trader" I'm thrilled to meet you all.
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msmaggie
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« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2005, 07:10:04 PM »

I might be interested., catching great crabs right now.not sure if the shipping charges are worth it . Shipped a dozen to Va a few weeks ago. Weighed 16# and cost over $50. cant imagine what they would have cost to send to Wa. Never had red rock but i love dungeness. Do you want them live or steamed???Not Quite sure you can ship them live or if they would survive the trip.  I'd be happy to steam them so they arive fit to eat. These are the best crabs I've seen all year but they wont last much longer. Going out again Monday. Let me know. --JC


Those are BEAUTIFUL and I thank you!  I'll be writing to you tomorrow eve after my outing.  Since you were the ONLY one that replied I'll send you 2 of each just for your willingness and warmth.  No need to reciprocate!  I know it's getting late there and your season is winding up. 

Be in touch tomorrow eve, running late for a date!
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msmaggie
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« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2005, 08:42:54 PM »

Hey all...  as promised here are pics from my day.

Was REALLY cold and windy out on the pier but I thought you might all be interested in seeing the difference between east and west coast crabbing.

1.  Arrived at the pier with my friend Jill...  I kept a look out....

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msmaggie
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« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2005, 08:44:51 PM »

There was this seal that kept STEALING our bait!
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msmaggie
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« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2005, 08:49:04 PM »

If you notice our "ring traps" are a bit bigger than what I used to use in MD.  ALSO, for those that don't like ring traps because they float and tip.. here is a tip for you, attach weights to the bottom and sides, if you don't know what I am speaking of, just e-mail me.

Anyway... instead of just dropping traps out here you fling them like a frisbee as Jill is demonstrating....  What a pro!
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msmaggie
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« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2005, 08:53:10 PM »

We only threw out one at a time since it was cold and they were ABUNDANT...   Here is our first throw coming up.  Two keepers.  They look small but, remember how big the net is!
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msmaggie
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« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2005, 08:56:26 PM »

When we got one out Jill decided that instead of steaming in the pot wouldn't it be BETTER to feed them beer and numb their pain before killing them?  (and at the same time try to increase their tasty flavor).  So....  we tried.
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msmaggie
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« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2005, 08:59:37 PM »

We only had to "throw" 4 more times to catch our limit.  Here is one "up close"
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msmaggie
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« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2005, 09:03:21 PM »

Another angle of  to show that these babies are GOOD!  over 25% of them are meat, love dem claws!
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msmaggie
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« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2005, 09:06:28 PM »

We were only catching "red rocks today" and we reached our limit in about 1 1/2 hours...  here they are at our feet.
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msmaggie
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« Reply #19 on: October 22, 2005, 09:14:35 PM »

Since red rocks are eaten similar to lobster the preferred method is crab dunked in butter.

They are cleaned BEFORE you cook them...  My trick for quickly killing a crab?  Jab a knitting needle in the mouth for a couple of seconds.  Much quicker than icing them or any other method, In my opinion anyway...

Anyhow, for 2 people here is our booty for only a couple hours cleaned and ready to dunk in butter.  No, it isn't a full table but it is a HUGE amount of crab.
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