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Author Topic: Flesh eating virus in Florida  (Read 2865 times)
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SHELLFISH
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« on: October 16, 2015, 11:41:23 AM »

A 56-year-old Polk County man is dead after contracting a rare type of flesh-destroying bacterial infection during a recent fishing trip to Estero Bay, according to his family.Richard Corley, a father of one from Winter Haven, likely contracted Vibrio vulnificus while wade fishing shortly after cutting his leg on Sept. 27, said his brother, Brian Corley. The infection, which initially resembled a bug bite, caused his leg to become blistered and swollen within a day.Doctors in Winter Haven performed surgery in an attempt to halt the infection's spread, family members said. But it was not enough: Corley died Sept. 30."It moved pretty quick," Brian Corely said. "I've never seen anything so bad in all my life. It just went from his legs to his stomach to his back. On his last night it started moving to his face and his head."Corley, a long-distance trucker and an avid outdoorsman, was fishing with two of his friends, neither of whom were infected, Brian Corley said. They had made regular trips to the area for the last 20 or so years without incident, he said.Florida has seen 37 such infections this year, a dozen of which resulted in death, according to the state Department of Health.Vibrio vulnificus is naturally present in warm, brackish waters. People typically become infected by eating contaminated seafood or by exposing open wounds to bacteria-infested warm seawater, experts said.Healthy people usually experience milder symptoms, such as vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Those with underlying medical conditions, such as liver disease, are as much as 80 times more likely to develop more serious blood-stream infections, half of which are fatal, the health department warns.Its most serious symptoms include infections causing the tissue to breakdown a condition known medically as "necrotizing fasciitis" that can lead to limb amputation."If you have an open wound and you go into salt water, there is the possibility of contracting the bacteria in that wound," said Scott Sjoblom, spokesman for the Florida Department of Health in Polk County. "But if you're a healthy person, and you have a good immune system and practice good hygiene and proper wound care, your chances of getting necrotizing fasciitis are extremely low."Richard Corley was generally healthy, Brian Corley said. But doctors told the family he may have shown some early signs of liver disease, he said.The department did not announce his death, nor did it identify Corley by name. But it did confirm that such a case had involved a Polk County man. Rather, Corley's family reached out to a Tampa-area news outlet as a way of warning the public.He said he thinks public health officials should do a better job of educating people about the risks of going into the water. He said he would like to see posted signs stating as much on boat ramps and beaches during the summer months."I'm not mad because he died. I'm hurt because he died," Brian Corley said. "But I think there needs to be more awareness. They do signs for manatees and no wake zones and different stuff like that."

There's some good info at this site: http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/vibrio-infections/vibrio-vulnificus/index.html?utm_source=article

Patty Gilmore Konietzky, whose husband died from Vibrio in 2013 has said this: "I wish the media would give more attention to the risk of this bacteria to fishermen. My husband of 35 yrs died in 2013 after coming in contact with this vicious bacteria while we were crabbing and shrimping along the Halifax River in Volusia County, FL. He had NO KNOWN CUTS on him. We did however come in contact with ants of which we both got bites from. The hospital verified that it was possible that the bacteria could have entered his bloodstream though those bites. It is also possible that he could have ingested it from cast netting. He like so many would put one of the weights in his mouth when throwing the net. I am at a loss as to why there is little to no focus on the rivers and tributary waters. I believe that there is a much higher risk to people who use these waters than those who swim in the ocean. The media seams to be looking for the "shark in the water" effect they get from their ratings by focusing on the ocean. On the other hand government officals are focusing on the opposite because they are terrified of how this will effect tourism. So they play it down. I am absolutely not trying to keep people from coming to Florida or to stop recreational activities like fishing by any means. I will still enjoy the waters here and I know that's exactly the way my husband would have wanted it. I truly want people to come here and enjoy what Florida has to offer. I only want everyone to know what risks are here and how to take precautions to avoid them. We are both native Floridians yet never once heard about this bacteria. The initial sign of this looked like a spider or bug bite. He told me it felt like a bad burn. If you have been in the water and see or feel anything like this go to the emergency room immediately and tell them where you were and what you were doing prior to seeing this on your body. They will most likely know exactly what it is and be able to treat it. DO NOT WAIT! Time is your enemy! I'm hoping that by telling my story it will save a life somewhere."

Think about all the times you've been in warm salt or brackish water or thrown a cast net with small cuts or bug bites.


This flesh eating virus isn't only in Florida! Please be careful out there!
« Last Edit: October 16, 2015, 11:45:00 AM by SHELLFISH » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2015, 06:27:57 PM »

Thanks for the heads up yes yes
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Dirichlet
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« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2015, 09:23:32 AM »

This flesh eating virus isn't only in Florida! Please be careful out there!
Not to be pedantic, but this isn't a virus - it's a bacteria (as stated in the text of the article).  They're two VERY different things.
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Crab Shack
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« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2015, 03:55:01 PM »

"Flesh eating zombie bistids!"    laugh
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NO CRABS WERE HARMED IN THE PRODUCTION OF THIS POST
WHAT WE'VE GOT HERE IS...FAILURE TO COMMUNICATE
YOU CAN'T FIX STUPID

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