October 23, 2018, 09:46:16 AM
 
*
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
 
 
 
Total time logged in: 0 minutes.
 
   Home   Help Login Register  

     
 

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: why am I catching all females 6/11/16  (Read 1417 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
sandmanadream
Registered User

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8
Location: suffolk va




Ignore
« on: June 12, 2016, 10:10:37 PM »

I fished the Hampton Bar and threw My two pots out for 4 hour soak . On the way back inn pulled my pots 40 females and 1 small male, I dropped my pots 300 yrds from the commercial guys pots. last week I fished the river and caught all males, I cant reason why this spot always has all females and no males when i crab the rivers the fishing is slow and the crabs are good. when I crab the bay the crabs are females and the fishing is good ? I would like to have some flounder and crabs together , the elizabeth river has small stripers and crokers but male crabs Tongue any ideas?HuhHuhHuh?
Logged
eastrnspdr
Registered User

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7
Location: Richmond, VA




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2016, 10:17:12 AM »

I think its because the female crabs like a higher salinity than the males so you're more likely to get females in the bay and males in the rivers. 
Logged
jack1747
Lifetime Member
Global Moderator
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 18502
Location: Virginias Eastern Shore - Pocomoke Sound


Crab'n is a way of life....


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2016, 10:32:41 AM »

I think its because the female crabs like a higher salinity than the males so you're more likely to get females in the bay and males in the rivers. 
Right on! thumbsup

Click on the little crab at the bottom of any page and all the info is there. 

"After mating, females migrate to high-salinity waters in lower estuaries, sounds, and near-shore spawning areas. They over-winter before spawning by burrowing in the mud. Most females spawn for the first time two to nine months after mating, usually from May through August the following season. The female extrudes fertilized eggs into a cohesive mass, or "sponge," that remains attached to her abdomen until the larvae emerge. The average sponge contains about two million eggs and is formed in about two hours."
Logged

"Helping to Moderate the BCA since 2003"

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

 
 
Home
 
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder


Google visited last this page October 20, 2018, 04:11:15 PM