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Author Topic: Trailer Repair  (Read 2958 times)
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#1 JIMMY
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« on: October 28, 2003, 04:41:22 PM »

Now that I am done crabbing for the season i want to replace some rollers on my trailer. It would be appreciated if someone could tell me the easiest way of getting my boat off of the trailer. I want to do the work in my driveway. I have a 14' aluminum boat(Duranautic side console) with a 30hp outboard. The trailer has the skid boards. Any suggestions?
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Crabpop
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« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2003, 06:11:20 PM »

#1Jimmy, my Load-Rite trailer has skid boards also, with rollers down the center.  I've never done this, but have given it some thought for the day that I need to replace the carpeting on the skidboards, the skidboards themselves, or the centerline rollers.  Easiest thing to do, of course, is put the boat in the water while you're doing the replacement.  Next easiest thing, if you want to replace the centerline rollers, is to get a high lift jack (like the roll-around ones they make for 4WD vehicles that has four wheels and the pump handle). Jack up the rear of the boat slightly (an inch or two) so that you can put some shim boards on top rear of each of the skidboards, just enough to clear the centerline rollers.  Do the same on the front of the boat.  This should give you room enough to remove/replace the centerline rollers.
Jack the rear and front of the boat up again just enough to remove the shim boards and let the boat back down on the carpeted skidboards.  Of course you want to do this on level ground, with your tow vehicle attached, emergency brake set, and trailer wheels fullly chocked.

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jack1747
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« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2003, 07:10:16 PM »

This may sound harsh but it really isnt.  Take the motor off.  Push the boat off the trailer onto the gound using a couple of friend for extra help with the stern until its on the ground.  My wife and I can do it with a 13 foot fiberglass boat with no problem.  When its time to put the boat back on just lift the bow onto the trailer, then just get your friends to pick up the stern and shove here back on the trailer. Its amazing how much work a couple of strong backs can do. Wink
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Darrell
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2003, 10:36:07 PM »

All Right heres how yards move big boats from trailers to stands. 1. they tie a line round the boat from bow to stern in a way that  cleats will not  pull off and sling shot forward under strain. The line is attached to something heavy like a truck to the rear of the boat. They jack up the stern a little bit and set jackstands under the hull to the sides then move the tow vechicle forward bit by bit setting jackstands or blocking under the keel as they go. Now remember the boat is being held in place by the line round the hull. When they get to the bow the jack it up a bit and block it up. To put the boat on the trailer they back the trailer up under the bow the attache the line round the hull again and winch the boat while backing the trailer under the boat removing the jackstands and blocking under the keel as they go. I have helped move 30 ft boats in this manner at my home port marina. A 14 ft aluminun boat will be easy to do in this way. but make sure you do not attach lines to a cleat that can give way amnd make sure your blocking is done so the boat will not fall over on you
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Darrell
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« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2003, 10:45:20 PM »

I should say that when they rig the line to put the boat on the tailer its reversed from stern to bow then winch the boat on the trailer slow removing the bocking and backing the trailer back as you go a winching away. It take two people one on the tow vech. and one on the winch. Or removing from the trailer one driving forward and one blocking and setting jackstands. Grin
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jack1747
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« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2003, 05:16:09 PM »

Trees work great as anchors, plus in the summer you can work in the shade.  Grin
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« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2003, 09:43:35 PM »

 :)True. If you have a tree it make a good anchor . I said truck because lots of boats are blocked up in open areas. To tell the truth I always wondered how they got those boats up on the jackstands without lifts.then when I saw and helped it was easy to understand. Course theres lots of tricks that watermen and marina railway operators know about moving a heavy item about.
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