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Author Topic: No Hope For Crab Picker Visas, Crab Houses  (Read 978 times)
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Wallco99
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« Reply #60 on: June 24, 2018, 09:33:58 PM »

I don't really think you are looking for a crab picker to fill the void in your field, so I can understand the qualified people being low for you. But we are talking about picking crabs for Christ's sake. Any moron with one arm can do that. Fortunately, most of the welfare bums have two arms, which makes them more than qualified to pull meat out of a shell and put it into a cup. I think my dog could do it if properly motivated, and if I let him eat a piece or two.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2018, 11:38:52 PM by Wallco99 » Logged
evinrude 130
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« Reply #61 on: June 24, 2018, 10:55:53 PM »

Ouch, hope things have improved since this study came out.  2010


A study was released by American University and the Centro de los Derechos del Migrante on Wednesday that documents experiences of Mexican women who have migrated to work as crab pickers in Maryland. Crab pickers are generally women because it is considered “lighter” work. They interviewed 43 women of the approximately 1,000 women that worked with crab companies last year. The findings resemble the human rights abuses of many companies that hire low wage labor from overseas and claim to support them effectively.

They described being charged illegal fees by recruiters in Mexico and enduring substandard working conditions in Maryland.
The women, few of whom spoke English, said they lived in housing with backed-up sewage and no working stove, lacked transportation to buy groceries or seek medical care, were not trained for their jobs or told how their paychecks and taxes were handled, and had a hard time picking enough pounds of crabmeat to make minimum wage.
“They get no formal training, they get cuts and infections, and they are charged fees to participate,” said Jayesh Rathod, an American University law professor who co-wrote the report.

Jack Brooks, president of the Chesapeake Bay Seafood Industries Association, claims that the crab pickers are paid and treated well. Different owners have different stories of what is considered good working conditions, but take “treated well,” with a grain of salt. One seafood store owner said in response to his employees sleeping ten to a room that, “they want to sleep in one room together.” Uh, right. The authors of the report recommend stricter oversight of guest-workers working conditions and better enforcement of rules protecting temporary workers.

Mexican women crab pickers mistreated in Maryland. - Feministing




 Another article on mexican pickers.
MEXICAN CRAB PICKERS WIN SUIT AGAINST MD. FIRM, N.C. COMPANY
By Meera Somasundaram
July 24, 1993
Fifteen Mexican women who worked as crab pickers on the Eastern Shore won a two-year court battle yesterday when a federal judge ruled that a Maryland seafood company and a North Carolina recruiter must pay them $115,458 for violating U.S. labor standards and their civil rights.

The workers complained in their civil lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, that they were discriminated against because of their nationality, paid less than the minimum wage and denied overtime pay two summers ago.

They had been brought to the Dorchester County, Md., town of Secretary in May 1991 to work for the Philip J. Harrington and Son Seafood Co., after being recruited by Capt'n Carl's Seafood Inc., of Goldsboro, N.C.

They were employed under a federal program that allows firms to hire foreign workers for jobs Americans are no longer willing to perform.

Crab picking, tedious and physically demanding, increasingly has fallen into that category.

The workers testified during the trial a year ago that their employers mistreated them, forbade them to leave the plant's premises unescorted, would not allow them to speak to other Latinos and threatened to abandon them at the border if they disobeyed.


The women also said they were fired after complaining to lawyers from the state Legal Aid Bureau and the American Civil Liberties Union about the working conditions.

During the trial, Philip J. Harrington III, the manager of the Eastern Shore plant, acknowledged that his family's company paid its Mexican migrant workers illegally low wages, but he said it was done out of ignorance, not malice. He disputed workers' allegations of mistreatment.

The workers won four of the eight counts of civil charges filed against the companies.

The judge, Benson Everett Legg, found the Harrington company not guilty of false imprisonment, involuntary servitude and emotional distress.

The companies and their attorney could not be reached by phone last night.

John Keeney Jr., one of the workers' attorneys, said, "We feel that the essence of the violations was captured by the judge. The court has recognized that Maryland employers are prohibited from treating Mexican employees differently from U.S. employees."

One of the 15 workers, Adriana Miranda Galaviz, who has returned to Mexico, said through a translator in a telephone interview last night, "I am very, very happy because I always trusted that it would come out in our favor. We always told the truth. It would have been an injustice if it had not come out in our favor, because we always did what was correct and what they asked us to do."

She had an opportunity to return to the United States as a crab-picker, but the prospective employer rescinded the offer after learning about the suit.


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GA
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« Reply #62 on: June 25, 2018, 12:38:19 AM »

The problem I see with crab picking jobs is that it is seasonal. Normally in seasonal jobs that exist only for the summer those can be filled with high school and college kids, however the crabbing season extends into the fall when those kids would go back to work, leaving these businesses with limited options for people to hire for this type of work. This is why legal migrant workers may be necessary for these industries.
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Wallco99
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« Reply #63 on: June 25, 2018, 12:41:32 AM »

Or welfare recipients, and maybe even residents of the Maryland State Correctional Facilities. Some make license plates, why can't other pick crabs? You can even kill two birds with one stone, since many of them are illegal immigrants (or migrant workers as you call them) as well. They are the perfect seasonal workers. When the season is over, they can go back to collecting their full welfare checks and others can return to prison full time. Win/win for everyone.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2018, 08:15:29 AM by Wallco99 » Logged
evinrude 130
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« Reply #64 on: June 25, 2018, 06:47:43 AM »

The problem I see with crab picking jobs is that it is seasonal. Normally in seasonal jobs that exist only for the summer those can be filled with high school and college kids, however the crabbing season extends into the fall when those kids would go back to work, leaving these businesses with limited options for people to hire for this type of work. This is why legal migrant workers may be necessary for these industries.





 Good point, had not thought about that. I remember going to Ocean City at the end of summer one year and talking to a owner down there about seasonal help. He said the same thing. They also had foreign help too and one worker told me the visa expired and they were going home to Russia.

 Seasonal help has it's limitations for sure.
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