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Author Topic: Tanking your catch?  (Read 1453 times)
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OStrich
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« on: December 05, 2017, 05:11:40 PM »

Hi guys,

New here, but not to crab...anyone tanking your catch??
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jack1747
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« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2017, 06:06:33 PM »

Huh  Huh
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evinrude 130
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« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2017, 06:42:13 PM »

I always tank the crab gods for being kind to me.  I guess that's what he meant.
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double E
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« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2017, 07:35:20 AM »

 Seeing you are from the Pacific NW, I am assuming you mean actually putting the crabs you catch in a tank (similar to deadliest catch) while on the boat.
Typically that is not done here with blue crabs for several reasons.
1- Water is to warm
2- Most boats that are used for catching Blue crabs are to small to have tanks large enough to keep that many crabs in.
3- It just is not necessary, these crabs can live several hours out of water if kept wet and in the shade, and days if kept in a cold box.

I suppose with a large enough tank(100's of gallons) and a constant supply of sea/bay water it could be done.   
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OStrich
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« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2017, 07:17:07 PM »

I always tank the crab gods for being kind to me.  I guess that's what he meant.

I feel like we already know each other...

Seeing you are from the Pacific NW, I am assuming you mean actually putting the crabs you catch in a tank (similar to deadliest catch) while on the boat.
Typically that is not done here with blue crabs for several reasons.
1- Water is to warm
2- Most boats that are used for catching Blue crabs are to small to have tanks large enough to keep that many crabs in.
3- It just is not necessary, these crabs can live several hours out of water if kept wet and in the shade, and days if kept in a cold box.

I suppose with a large enough tank(100's of gallons) and a constant supply of sea/bay water it could be done.   

Very close...but I gather from the answers that it is rare to non-existent.

Thanks guys!!

If anyone does, please PM me...thanks!
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Wallco99
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« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2017, 09:09:36 PM »

I always tank the crab gods for being kind to me.  I guess that's what he meant.
I take it he's Asian.
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evinrude 130
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« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2017, 09:54:39 PM »

Would this be what is being ask about?

https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/64039/Fact-sheet-for-Tanking-recommendations.pdf

The Queensland Government has developed
best practice guidelines for the handling and
storage of mud crabs from harvest to table.
These guidelines were developed as a way to
reduce the stress levels of muddies, decrease
mortality after harvest and to increase the eating
quality of the catch.
This fact sheet provides key information on
holding live mud crabs in aquariums or tanks.
Tanking crabs
 Recover crabs as per Recovery Procedures
Factsheet. This will minimise contamination
in your tanks water.
 Use clean seawater and monitor water
quality regularly by checking:
 temperature (18C 25C)
 pH (7.9 - 8.1) use sodium bicarbonate to
increase
 salinity (15 - 35ppm)
 ammonia (<0.1mg/L)
 nitrate (<50mg/L)
 nitrite (<0.3mg/L)
 Conduct regular water exchanges as nitrites
do not break down readily and will reach
toxic levels over time.
 Provide adequate but not vigorous
circulation and/or aeration.
 Install a bio-filter to suit the tanks
volume/stocking density.
 Cover tank to reduce exposure to light,
breeze, evaporation and disturbance.
 Ensure crabs are tied tightly.
 Check all crabs regularly one dead crab
can cause others to die.
 Do not feed crabs as it is unnecessary and
may effect water quality.
 Larger storage tanks as above and:
 Store crabs in lug baskets lined with shade
cloth to stop leg tip damage. Raise baskets
25mm off the tank floor
 Pack crabs tightly to reduce movement.
Alternate holding systems
Several innovative systems have proved useful.
 Consider a spray tank system. This will:
 minimise stress to the crabs
 provide a constant (ambient) temperature
 produce less maintenance on system
 provide a fail safe in power outages
 promote self cleaning of crab waste
 encourages a low weight loss %
 Install a solid false bottom floor with
drainage to a submerged pump.
 A garden irrigation system or similar will
create even mist.
 Use saline water for short-term holding.
 Ensure the surface area is large enough to
hold crabs stacked a maximum of three high
this enables easy checking for mortalities,
reduces crowding and allows adequate
exposure to mist.
 Crabs should be covered to reduce
exposure to light, breeze, evaporation and
disturbance.
 Drain and clean tanks regularly (crab
through-put dependent).
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