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Author Topic: Decreasing male-to-female blue crab ratio concerns scientists  (Read 1944 times)
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Neither Crab
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« Reply #40 on: April 15, 2019, 06:06:00 AM »

Lots of posts but does anyone have a solution?
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evinrude 130
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« Reply #41 on: April 15, 2019, 06:32:16 AM »

Lots of posts but does anyone have a solution?









LOL, you already know that answer. Trial and error seems to be the only way to find a solution short of closing down the season. The recent(years ago) rule changes were about the recs not keeping females. The slight size change in July.  Shutting down the season 10 days early one year. 

 We saw what the rockfish moratorium did. They came back , but are now in trouble again. Why, over harvesting and water issues seem to stick out. DNR doesn't have the gonads to do what is truly best for the resources. They are afraid they will upset a lot of people, SMH.  Just do it.   

 Just keep on taking what you can catch, your paid for license allows it.
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Mr. Ray III
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« Reply #42 on: April 15, 2019, 06:35:46 AM »

Lots of posts but does anyone have a solution?

This all started when DNR came up with the sook bushel limits.  The solution is simple, get rid of the sook bushel limits. 
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« Reply #43 on: April 15, 2019, 07:27:18 AM »

Lots of posts but does anyone have a solution?
One of the "top of the food chain" guys told me, "We don't know what to do".  Undecided
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"Helping to Moderate the BCA since 2003" "I've gotten to the point in my life where I no longer give a [shiz] what people think, I'm not going to take any [shiz], because, frankly my dears, I am NOT in the [shiz] business." Quote from Suzy. :-)
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« Reply #44 on: April 15, 2019, 07:56:39 AM »

One of the "top of the food chain" guys told me, "We don't know what to do"Undecided

Sounds like you spoke to a member of Congress. That is their slogan.
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« Reply #45 on: April 15, 2019, 08:51:14 AM »

We already got a solution from Fired  Maryland DNR manager Brenda Davis who was fired by Gov. Larry Hogan for suggesting raising male crabs to 5.5 in. all season to provide females with enough sexually mature male to breed successfully . 10 Dorchester county watermen protested the change and Hogan fired her . Were they right?
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Mr. Ray III
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« Reply #46 on: April 15, 2019, 09:05:08 AM »

Yes, they were right.  LA, FL, SC, NC, and VA all have a 5'' minimum.  How come they don't have the same problem we have?
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evinrude 130
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« Reply #47 on: April 15, 2019, 09:05:55 AM »

We already got a solution from Fired  Maryland DNR manager Brenda Davis who was fired by Gov. Larry Hogan for suggesting raising male crabs to 5.5 in. all season to provide females with enough sexually mature male to breed successfully . 10 Dorchester county watermen protested the change and Hogan fired her . Were they right?









 Those 10 folks didn't like that solution, it got her fired, LOL. They had some kind of power ,didn't they.

 Each year that the DNR waits to pull the trigger on a crab moratorium, crabbing takes a bigger hit. Unfortunately it takes a whole season to see how or if the crab population is doing. A season of harvesting as many crabs allowed by law. At the end of the season, many more male and female crabs will had been caught again. Only then will the crabbers know if the crab population is okay. Ironic isn't it, if the season sucks, then folks might get worried. LMAO

 But the watermen and the DNR will wait till the next year again to make any adjustment, I'll bet they don't.  Crabs are always up and down, will be the excuse. Or the famous, we don't know, recs never report their catch, LOL.

 
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« Reply #48 on: April 15, 2019, 11:17:48 AM »

Yes, they were right.  LA, FL, SC, NC, and VA all have a 5'' minimum.  How come they don't have the same problem we have?
 That answer hasn't  helped it work here. I would rather try it an maybe be wrong than do nothing or blame it on something else. I can't see waiting for crabs to get to 1% of what they were like they did with oysters. We know that doesn't work. One thing is for sure. We can't crab our way out of this problem. That's like trying to spend your way out of dept.
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evinrude 130
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« Reply #49 on: April 15, 2019, 11:54:57 AM »

LA  is making changes to help their crab population. I recall they shut down the season for a while, a unprecedented move.

https://www.lafisheriesforward.org/blue-crab-harvest-regulations-for-2019/
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evinrude 130
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« Reply #50 on: April 15, 2019, 12:11:02 PM »

 That answer hasn't  helped it work here. I would rather try it an maybe be wrong than do nothing or blame it on something else. I can't see waiting for crabs to get to 1% of what they were like they did with oysters. We know that doesn't work. One thing is for sure. We can't crab our way out of this problem. That's like trying to spend your way out of "debt".



 Fixed that (debt) for  you.  

I do agree with you that trying something is better then doing nothing.  Just keep catching and hoping 5" crabs are the answer seems not productive. Other states have a different environment and quantity of crabbers most likely. We can assume the weather, pollution, Conowingo Dam, farm run off, plus any other type of idea where the water is ruined probably affects every resource in the Chesapeake Bay.  But let's not conveniently forget the pressure put on crabs by all the comms and recs.  That would be totally wrong.

 Catching the crabs that can help replenish the crab population is wrong too. The late fall female catch is definitely a reason for lack of crabs. Those female crabs are headed to the ocean for spawning.  $20 a bushel for females, outrageous  to me. A bushel of female crabs that could help bring back the crab population, what are folks thinking?  Now multiple that by hundreds of bushels.
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Mr. Ray III
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« Reply #51 on: April 15, 2019, 01:35:47 PM »

So you would suggest to "try something"?  That's what DNR has been doing all along.  Throwing $hit at the wall and seeing what sticks.  Problem is, all of it sticks and never does any good.  Now we have a bunch of idiotic regulations like days off, hail in reporting, and time limits.
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evinrude 130
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« Reply #52 on: April 15, 2019, 01:51:18 PM »

Have to think those regulations you mentioned pertain to the commercial side mostly. DNR just trying to rein in the industry, maybe because of past problems with over fishing. Which means controlling how much is caught in a day. Not catching every day of the week, though with crab pots, that's impossible.
 The recs have some restrictions like that, except for time limits. We still have a day off.

 What they have to try is anything that gets the crab population to be at higher numbers.  Female harvest restrictions in late fall, possibly shutting down that catch. Closing the season a month or month and 1/2 earlier.  Procrastinating  isn't getting it done.  

 I like crabs and catching crabs, but having a good amount of crabs in the Chesapeake Bay is more important then making money or eating crabs. I'll sacrifice whatever needs to be done to accomplish it.  There are those who would not even consider doing that.  

 Just my opinion, not everyone thinks alike. Been crabbing since I was kid in the 60's. I've seen how the crabs have been pressured over time . Without any of the current catching restrictions, good chance we would be seeking even lower levels of crabs in the bay. Took a while for DNR to even impose those regulations.

 Crabbers have never offered to sacrifice anything on their own, from what I saw growing up. DNR  had to step in.
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« Reply #53 on: April 15, 2019, 03:47:29 PM »

I don't think Virginia is having any crab slow down like we are. There are plenty of females near the BB tunnel that swim up the Bay with eggs attached along the surface all summer long. Could it be crabs don't come up the Bay in Maryland waters like they used to for some reason like too much rain? It wasn't bad in 2017.
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« Reply #54 on: April 15, 2019, 04:12:37 PM »

I don't think Virginia is having any crab slow down like we are. There are plenty of females near the BB tunnel that swim up the Bay with eggs attached along the surface all summer long. Could it be crabs don't come up the Bay in Maryland waters like they used to for some reason like too much rain? It wasn't bad in 2017.
Once Sooks make the migration to the mouth of the bay they do not return north.  "After the females mate and migrate to spawning areas, they either remain there for the rest of their lives or move only short distances out to sea." https://www.bluecrab.info/lifecycle.html
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« Reply #55 on: April 15, 2019, 04:39:44 PM »

Did you see less male crabs overall last year? I've never seen a sponge crab in the upper bay .
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Wallco99
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« Reply #56 on: April 15, 2019, 06:58:44 PM »

Enough already!!! This whole "crab shortage crisis" was just fabricated by DNR to impose MORE regulations on crabbers and collect more fines from folks who break these unnecessary rules. There is no crab shortage. People base an entire season on the State going out one day and dredging up crabs in a certain location, an area that the crabs may not be settled in that particular year. Then panic when the dredges only pull up a limited amount. This is all [bull dung]. We have gotten two bushels, or [dang] near that, every trip out the past 10 years, with the exception of last season. But by year's end, we were getting our limit. Last year it rained almost EVERY DAY, flooding the rivers with fresh water. You all know that is the cause of last year's slow start, yet continue to bicker about how many more regs we can add and what we can do to save our bay. The recs will use this opportunity to say the comms are over fishing the waters, and the comms will rebut by saying that only THEY have the right to fish those waters. Stop whining and go crabbing. There are millions of crabs to be caught, regardless of what dredge reports claim, or what new liberal regulations may stand in your way. We have pictures of every one of our trips the past few seasons. And even though last year took a little longer than most, we still got our two bushels every week from the last week in September on, pictures will show that. Before September, it was nonstop rains for months, pushing the brackish waters from the Wye river out into the Eastern Bay. Those of you who are suggesting more regulations are just simpletons.
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evinrude 130
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« Reply #57 on: April 15, 2019, 07:02:48 PM »

I don't think Virginia is having any crab slow down like we are. There are plenty of females near the BB tunnel that swim up the Bay with eggs attached along the surface all summer long. Could it be crabs don't come up the Bay in Maryland waters like they used to for some reason like too much rain? It wasn't bad in 2017.






From what I read, Virginia gets their shot of catching a lot of crabs in the beginning of the season. Have seen reports of potters pulling their pots after that due to the crabs moving further north. I guess because of the salinity content being too high if it's a real dry season. Don't know how they do in the latter part of the season. But someone is catching those females.

The crabs look for that right content of water , sometimes way north, like Elkridge, MD. The upper rivers and tribs sometimes are the hotter crabbing spots when the water conditions (salinity, oxygen levels) are perfect for crabbing. All depends on the weather, time of year, and salinity content.  Those crabs seem to search out good conditions, IMHO.

 Never have seen a sponge crab from the areas I have crabbed since I was a kid. Magothy River and the Patapsco River. Most times in a creek or close to the shoreline(6'-9').

 Hoping we have a decent season, just need enough to eat for family and friends(3-4 dozen).  Of course the yearly late fall(2 bushels) for 2 huge pots of crab soup. Which is just about gone, LOL.
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richie crabber
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« Reply #58 on: April 15, 2019, 11:22:23 PM »

There is too many people live around chesapeake bay and too many farms polluting the bay no regulations going to change that problems it's too expensive to fix. It's hard to keep creatures in dirty aquarium. I believe  regulations are needed without regulations people will dry up resources so what is going to be solution to this no win situation ? IMHO You have to manage the fishery as best as you can and when that fail set moratorium on species but with regulations we have in place I really  don't  think problem is over fishing I believe  problem is condition of chesapeake bay.
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« Reply #59 on: April 16, 2019, 04:58:32 AM »

Good points . Now we have that settled . Catch em up.
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