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Author Topic: Problems running trotline  (Read 1219 times)
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SlickCam
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« Reply #20 on: June 24, 2019, 07:54:54 PM »

Ditch the danforth, 2-18lb river anchors will last you for 15-20 years, or save your rotors from your next brake job. The line from float to anchor is the anchor line... longer the better here just like on your boat, too steep an angle and the anchor will slip. The control line from float to trotline chain should be about the same length as your anchor line. If it's too short it will cause that anchor line to be too steep again as the chain comes off the bottom too soon.
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Mr. Ray III
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« Reply #21 on: June 24, 2019, 09:03:13 PM »

Cinder blocks hold great.  Used them many times.  Put the line through an old garden hose to prevent chaffing.  Make the lines from your buoy to anchor and buoy to trotline at least 40í
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Watermen and Seafood, Can't Have One Without The Other
Wallco99
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« Reply #22 on: June 25, 2019, 12:00:40 AM »

Almost anything heavy will work. The point of the danforth for me is when running two trotlines, I need four weights (two for each line). So instead of bringing four 30 pound weights (120 pounds of weights) I use two 4 pound danforths on the beginning of the lines, which hold the bottom incredibly well, and two 30 pound dumbbells on the opposite end of lines (Total 68 pounds of weights and anchors). We're not all running giant commercial boats, so with all the gear we need to bring, the more pounds we can shave off the better. Plus, I used to use the four weights for about 20 years, before I switched to danforths. As many times as you have to pull the lines in, the more times you can pull up much lighter weights than heavier ones, the easier it is on the body. This year I am going to experiment with four anchors and no weights. I will tie a second line and mini float to my anchor, as to be able to adjust tension on line. Tom (Pintail) made me two special anchors out of window sash weights that I gave him. He welded a special ring on these anchors, on which I can tie my secondary adjustment line. I will use my regular danforths on the beginning of line as usual, and these new anchors on the far end. Now my total weight for all four is down to 20 pounds. Danforths WON'T drag. River anchors, rotors, cinder blocks, or any other heavy [arse] thing that is tied to your line, all possibly can, in certain situations.
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Wallco99
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« Reply #23 on: June 25, 2019, 12:01:24 AM »

Ok. Not sure I understand completely.  There is an anchor and then 25í to float and then 25í to3í chain and then the trotline.  The other end will be the same except for going to try a 30 lb dead weight.  What needs to be longer?  The line from the anchor to the float, from the float to the chain of both?  Why does this matter.  Thank you for the help. Just donít understand this part. 

The answer to your question is BOTH.
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Wallco99
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« Reply #24 on: June 25, 2019, 12:16:21 AM »

Slickcam is correct about your line being too short causing problems, but as I said earlier, other problems could also arise if it is too long as well. I have seen it. Stick with 3 to 5 times the depth of the water and you should be fine. I set all my lines at 36'. That usually gets me up to 14' of water depth (slightly less than 3 to 1 ratio at 14', but it works). I also have several other lines already  made up (about 25' each) with quick snap swivels on the ends. I keep these under my seat. If we are going in deeper water, I snap on another 25' or 50' to my line in less than a minute. If we crab in really shallow water, I still leave the 36' lines on, but we are much more cautious about not hitting our lead/anchor lines than we would need to be in deeper waters. Since the longer line takes a lot more distance to reach the bottom from the buoy in shallower water than it does in deeper water (hypotenuse and angle of the triangle), it is AT or ABOVE prop height for a longer time and distance in the shallower water.
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evinrude 130
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« Reply #25 on: June 25, 2019, 06:14:04 AM »

Found the answer yet. Everyone is similar to how they rig up the weights, lead lines. It's just a personal preference each crabber has . Experiment, over time you will find what you like and don't like. Going out with a crabber helps. Your boat also has an affect on trot lining.  Some boats sit deeper in the water then others. The motor has to be able to give the power you need also. You already know about too much power.

 Time on the water is helpful too. Have to be able to handle the boat and the trotline together at the same time. I've net 2 or 3 crabs and had the boat move too close to the line of move away. Then you have to get the boat back on line while looking for crabs, LOL.  You could just drop the line and stop over again, but no one that I've seen does that. Keeping the line tight is essential. To much slack causes problems too.

 You mentioned you started last year using the TL. It's a gradual learning process that takes time.  You'll get it eventually with tweaks here and there. Don't give up, TL is an easy way for catching crabs when everything comes together. But just accept that Murphy's law is always in play.  How you handle it says a lot about you.
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jamie642
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« Reply #26 on: June 25, 2019, 06:18:30 AM »

Ok. I think Iíve got it. Like the idea of a few extra lines and adjusting the length when necessary. Will go to 38í lines, keep the 25 footers to add on in deeper water and see how that goes. I will post an update.
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shedking
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« Reply #27 on: June 25, 2019, 06:19:19 AM »

[quote author=Wallco99 link=topic=93087. If we crab in really shallow water, I still leave the 36' lines on, but we are much more cautious about not hitting our lead/anchor lines than we would need to be in deeper waters. Since the longer line takes a lot more distance to reach the bottom from the buoy in shallower water than it does in deeper water (hypotenuse and angle of the triangle), it is AT or ABOVE prop height for a longer time and distance in the shallower water.
[/quote]

As we found out itís not just you hitting this ya need to worry about.
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Each one of us here today will at one time in our lives look upon a loved one who is in need and ask the same question: We are willing to help, Lord, but what, if anything, is needed? For it is true we can seldom help those closest to us. Either we don't know what part of ourselves to give or, more often than not, the part we have to give is not wanted. And so it is those we live with and should know who elude us. But we can still love them - we can love completely without complete understanding.

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