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Author Topic: Snaring Crabs  (Read 1525 times)
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JimM
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« on: September 19, 2019, 08:25:24 AM »

Folks,

I have a hare-brained idea to create crab snares and try them in the OC bays and ocean. Basically it's just a small, weighted bait basket with snare loops ... used on a handline or fishing rod. The loops might catch a leg or claw (it could happen) and then the steady retrieve should keep the loops closed.

First, has anyone tried this?

Second, I can't find anything in the regs about this method. Maybe I am missing something. It's recreational use and may even be fun.

Thanks,
Jim

I searched the forum for snares and got a lot of history ... and some funny dialogs ... but not much on the effectiveness. I suppose I'll just have to give it a try and report back.

And I found another "style" ... bait is skewered and the loops do the catching ...


« Last Edit: September 19, 2019, 09:02:01 AM by JimM » Logged
JimM
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« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2019, 09:54:21 AM »

CrabbyMike,

There isn't a trigger per se. There are some number of just loose loops (like nooses) that freely draw up on the feeding crab as the device is pulled away or the crab tries to escape. Nothing happens until you put some tension on the device and a part of the crab gets caught.

It's hard to see in the example in the picture, but there are six loops on the ring. The bait would be skewered on that center post and your rod would be attached to the metal loop. Imagine a crab wandering in to feed on the bait and stepping over all those open nooses. Raising the rod pulls the device and if any of the loops get hung up on the crab, they will be pulled closed as the crab tries to get away.

From the legal perspective, the crabs are free to escape until the crabber does some action. It's not like a pot that works unattended.

I've seen them work on the heavy, slow CA crabs but not for blue crabs. There are more efficient methods for sure but this could be an alternative to plain hand lining ... if it works.

I've sent a note to the MD DNR without a reply as yet. We have a trip planned to OBX and I will give it a try there and report back. That one pictured is only about $4. Not too bad to try out the concept.
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tbishop
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« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2019, 02:19:48 PM »

I think you are going to be snagging a lot more than crabs (all the [curd] on the bottom, maybe even a crab trap with crabs in it). Grin
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Crab Shack
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« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2019, 03:32:46 PM »

Folks,

I have a hare-brained idea to create crab snares....  
Jim


You mean like this?  
   






« Last Edit: September 23, 2019, 04:18:52 PM by Crab Shack » Logged

NO CRABS WERE HARMED IN THE PRODUCTION OF THIS POST
WHAT WE'VE GOT HERE IS...FAILURE TO COMMUNICATE
YOU CAN'T FIX STUPID
Crab Shack
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« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2019, 12:47:30 AM »

Crab snares are mainly used for Dungeness crabs on the west coast.  That video was from Florida. Since I'm land-locked so to speak and can't go out in a boat anymore, it seems like snares used with a fishing pole is the best way of catching a decent amount of crabs.              





« Last Edit: September 24, 2019, 03:06:48 AM by Crab Shack » Logged

NO CRABS WERE HARMED IN THE PRODUCTION OF THIS POST
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JimM
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« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2019, 07:23:40 AM »

Quote
Crab snares are mainly used for ...

That's the idea. Thanks for the video. So they "work" in the right conditions. AND they look like a pain to release the tangled crabs, but I'll cross that bridge when I get to it.

Now I just need to hear back from the State as to being legal.

Thanks for taking the original post seriously!
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JimM
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« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2019, 11:21:25 AM »

Folks,

Just heard back from the MD DNR ... the pertinent exchange was:

Me:
I think I've read all of the MD regulations for recreational crabbing. There is a list of the legal methods for catching blue crabs and an implication that these are the ONLY methods that are legal. I suppose I could stop there and ask if that assumption is accurate. (... there was more but not relevant to this thread)


Keith Lockwood:
Hello Jim, you are correct crab snares are not legal in Maryland, the listed gears are the only legal gears. 
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Crab Shack
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« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2019, 11:49:29 AM »

That's the idea. Thanks for the video. So they "work" in the right conditions. AND they look like a pain to release the tangled crabs, but I'll cross that bridge when I get to it.

Now I just need to hear back from the State as to being legal.

Thanks for taking the original post seriously!



Snares for Dungeness crabs use thicker material like weed wacker line which makes it easier to release the crab. (the crabs there are more lethargic then they are on the east coast due to the colder water)  Since blue claw crabs are more aware of thicker lines, best bet is to use monofilament. I emailed those guys in the video, to find out how they release the crabs, I'll post their reply as soon as I get it.
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« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2019, 12:18:27 PM »

Unless the regs specifically state that snares are not allowed geer, I think you can argue that point (Is it worth your time and effort?   I think not.)  This crabhawk like device isn't on the list (I don't think everyone at the DNR is aware of it) but should be because it doesn't use snares and can let the crab escape unharmed.  I bought a couple of them on Ebay..
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NO CRABS WERE HARMED IN THE PRODUCTION OF THIS POST
WHAT WE'VE GOT HERE IS...FAILURE TO COMMUNICATE
YOU CAN'T FIX STUPID
JimM
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« Reply #9 on: October 02, 2019, 10:59:37 AM »

"This crabhawk like device isn't on the list (I don't think everyone at the DNR is aware of it) but should be because it doesn't use snares and can let the crab escape unharmed."

Crab Shack

I agree. This is a design distinction from the old pyramid traps and I think would be legal because the method isn't different. It's not spring loaded and looks like fun for kids too. If you find out release methods for the snare, that would be a read.

My plan is to make or buy one or two and take my chances. If and when I give it a try (for rabbits, squirrels, crabs, manatees, etc.), I'll post something back.

btw .. whole different subject. I contacted the MD DNR about sifting through upper Potomac river sand and you would have thought I'd shot a moose with a howitzer on parkland adjacent to an elementary school. Keep in mind that wading in the upper Potomac is completely legal and that the river bottom is disturbed. Also keep in mind that the Potomac moves trillions of cubic yards of sand naturally so that the river is constantly changing. Also keep in mind that all of the natural material would fall right back where it came from ... minus the golf balls, pennies, nickels, dimes, fish hooks, etc. that I might find.

Their response was "no way" and the logic was that I would be disturbing the ecosystem. It's this kind of irrational thinking that makes us wonder when the river will be off limits to everyone.

End of my rant for the day.

Have a good one!
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JimM
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« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2019, 09:13:40 AM »

OK Folks ... I have a definitive answer on "Do they work?" regarding snares for blue crabs.

They do and it's fun.

Family made a trip to the OBX and we had a place on the ocean (off-season of course) with the dunes creeping right into the back of the house. From the balcony I used the snare with chicken neck for land crabs. Those little buggers are quick! Worked fine and didn't matter too much what size ... 2 inches to about 5 inches. The trick was letting them loose.

Having success at that, I took a morning and waded into the Sound with the same gear. Cast it toward the "depths", wait 2-3 minutes, lift the rod and start reeling steadily. Landed blue crabs on about every other cast. I suppose more patience would have yielded better results. I don't know the size limits for NC, but out of roughly 30 crabs caught 8 were eating size. Not bad for wading out to about 2.5 feet and casting for crabs. I'd bet the depth of the snare wasn't much more than 3 ft. The only issue was "snaring" grass and debris, but that was minor. Resetting the loops only takes a second or two.

It's not efficient, but it is fun, cheap and easy ... not bad qualities depending on the topic.

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Jckass
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« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2019, 08:53:30 PM »

I started using the crab snare with the bait box this year and have had nothing but success! It works on a fishing pole but it works better when you throw it out as far as you can! I have caught up to three crab one time in it! You  wait until they fight over the bait and try to pull it away! Next year I'm going to put a gopro on the bait box and see it in real action. I hope this helps but it does work on blue crab! My last post, I have a picture of a crab in a snare. Take a look.
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jp57
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« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2019, 09:32:46 AM »

I think I am going to build some over the winter and give them a shot next year.
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